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760-218-6945.
Discount Offered.

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29 Palms Adobe Tinting
5984 Adobe Road
29 Palms Ca.

760-218-6945

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Lynnette’s Legal Document Assistance, Notary Public,
29 Palms, Yucca Valley
& HI-Desert Ca.

Lynnette Rose Paralegal, Mortgage signing agent, Notary Yucca valley, 29 Palms, HI-Desert Ca.,living will, awdepot, will, legal form templates, legal aid, law depot, contract, legal documents, us legal forms, legal agreement, legal document preparer, legal paper, contracts, legal docs online, legal document services, legal documents , power of attorney form , living trust, legal forms, free legal advice, divorce lawyer, divorce papers, legal advice, legal support services , paralegal, legal help online, affordable legal services , family law, legal zoom com , last will and testament,

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Specialties

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power of attorney, deeds, notary, process server,
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Lynnette’s Legal Document Assistance, Notary Public, 29 Palms, Yucca Valley
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Car Insurance Explained,
& What to Do After a Car Accident!









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Scroll down for books & articles.


How Cars Work is a completely illustrated primer describing the 250 most important car parts and how they work. This mini test book includes wonderfully simple line drawings and clear language to describe all the automotive systems as well as a glossary, index, and a test after each chapter.

How Cars Work is a completely illustrated primer describing the 250 most important car parts and how they work. This mini test book includes wonderfully simple line drawings and clear language to describe all the automotive systems as well as a glossary, index, and a test after each chapter. How Cars Work provides the basic vocabulary and mechanical knowledge to help a reader talk intelligently with mechanics understand shop manuals, and diagnosis car problems. Tom Newton guides the reader with a one topic per page format that delivers information in bite size chunks, just right for teenage boys. How Cars Work was the most stolen book at Kennedy High School in Richmond California! Teachers like our title and so do librarians. The History channel, Modern Marvels-2000, Actuality Productions, Inc is using How Cars Work to train staff for a documentary on automobiles.




From Motorbooks, the leader in automotive publishing for over 4 decades, comes the most practical car care guide ever produced to help the average car owner maintain and repair his or her vehicle – How to Repair Your Car. In this easy-to-follow guide, author Paul Brand, a nationally known automotive expert, takes you through the steps of auto maintenance and repair—simple steps that could add years to a car’s life and save a driver thousands of dollars in repairs. This is also the only car maintenance and repair guide on the market to contain 50 do-it-yourself projects in full-color, step-by-step instructions that are easy to follow and understand.
Focusing on post-1985 cars (with occasional explanations about earlier models), Brand introduces readers to the rudiments of automotive systems—from electrical, fuel, and cooling to drivetrain, suspension, tires, brakes, and exhaust—and discusses problems that arise in each system. The book includes practical advice for readers with only a passing knowledge of cars, as well as the basics of caring for a car’s exterior and interior.









The Mustang Car History

In the early 1960s, Lee Iacocca?”then director of the Ford division at Ford Motor Company?”convinced Henry Ford II to produce a sporty four-seat car aimed at the emerging youth market. That car, essentially a reconfigured and re-skinned Falcon economy car, became the Ford Mustang, and it changed the automotive world like no other car before or since. In Mustang: Fifty Years, acclaimed Mustang writer Donald Farr celebrates this unbroken lineage of muscle: its phenomenal first-year sales, the new “pony car” genre it pioneered, and subsequent models that include the Mustang GT, Shelby GT350, Shelby GT500, Super Cobra Jet, Boss 302 and Boss 429?”all part of a line of American performance cars that continues on to this day. With 400 photos of the USA’s iconic sports car and released in tandem with the Mustang’s 50th anniversary, Mustang: Fifty Years is a must on the bookshelf of any gearhead or Ford aficionado.






And for the kids

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The Mouse and the Motorcycle

In this imaginative adventure from Newbery Medal–winning author Beverly Cleary, a young mouse named Ralph is thrown into a world of excitement when a boy and his shiny toy motorcycle check in to the Mountain View Inn. This timeless classic now features a foreword written by New York Times bestselling author Kate DiCamillo, as well as an exclusive interview with Beverly Cleary herself.

When the ever-curious Ralph spots Keith’s red toy motorcycle, he vows to ride it. So when Keith leaves the bike unattended in his room one day, Ralph makes his move. But with all this freedom (and speed!) come a lot of obstacles. Whether dodging a rowdy terrier or keeping his nosy cousins away from his new wheels, Ralph has a lot going on! And with a pal like Keith always looking out for him, there’s nothing this little mouse can’t handle.







Adobe Tinging 29 Palms, Tinting and books about cars.

More Car books








wiki
How to Travel by Car with Your Dog

Preparing to Travel with Your Dog
Image titled Travel by Car with Your Dog Step 11
Figure out how you want to restrain your dog in the car. It is not safe to let a dog roam a car unrestrained. Consider crating your dog if you are driving a long distance or if your dog is a nervous passenger. It is the most effective way of keeping a dog put while you are driving. Having a dog crated will help you to focus on driving instead of on the dog, which is important because distracted drivers can easily cause accidents.[1] It will also keep your dog safe if you have to stop quickly or if you get in an accident.
If you don’t want to crate your dog, at least find a way to make sure your dog is secure. For instance if you have a station wagon, consider confining your dog to the back portion of the car. If you do have a large window boot, put up a wire grid to stop your dog jumping over the back of the seats. Line the dog’s area with dog blankets or place its bed in the corner so he or she can nap comfortably on the journey. Make sure you don’t have any heavy loose items, such as bowls or bottles, as those can become dangerous projectiles in an accident. Most dogs find sleeping an easy way to cope with motion sickness.
You could also purchase a dog safety seat. While it is not as secure as a crate, it will be safer and more comfortable than a car seat for your dog if you turn or stop the car suddenly. The most popular among these are bucket seats. They attach at the back of the front seats, and the top of the back seats, creating a soft well in which your dog, and any liquids (or solids!) they may create, are contained. These can be made with a blanket or purchased cheaply.
Car seatbelts for dogs are a great tool if you don’t want your dogs confined, or if you have a two-seat car. Make sure to attach them to a harness, and not a collar. They clip into the female buckle of a car seatbelt on one end, and have a standard leash clip on the other. By attaching them to a harness, you ensure the dog is secured by the body, and their neck won’t be damaged in an emergency.
If you use a crate, make sure it is secured. Make sure it is very secure to prevent it from moving if you stop quickly or get hit. An unsecured crate can be just as, or even more dangerous than an unsecured dog.

Read the full report click here







9 Tips for Long Drives

by Nationwide.com
Click here for the article

Planning on doing some long distance driving? These long road trips tips can help you get there safely and comfortably.

If you’re taking a long road trip, you need to plan in advance. And we’re not just talking about packing. “Highway hypnosis” is quite common when travelers haven’t prepared for the endurance demands of an extended haul. In fact, more than 60 percent of drivers say they’ve gotten behind the wheel while drowsy, according to a survey by mattress retailer Sleepy’s.

With that statistic in mind, you should take steps to prepare for long drives before you get behind the wheel—and to stay alerted and energized throughout your trip. These tips for long drives will help you down the road.

1. Stock your sleep time

Think about exhaustion before you begin your journey, not after. Get at least seven hours of sleep for two consecutive nights before the road trip to build up your energy reserves. “Also, try to avoid driving between 1 and 3 p.m., when the body’s temperature is lower and people are naturally drowsy,” says Dr. Michael Breus, a.k.a. “The Sleep Doctor.”

2. Fuel up

This time, we mean fuel for you, not your car. Carrying a variety of vitamin-packed, healthy foods will allow you to get by on smaller snacks throughout the long drive while skipping the fast-food stops. “To stay alerted, carrots and almonds are my favorites,” says blogger and travel expert Gretchen Breuner from TheRoadScholarz.com.

3. Stay hydrated

Keep the water supply well-stocked for maximum energy. “A possible downside of this, of course, is that you’ll need to make more bathroom stops,” says Breuner, who traveled to 19 states with her family in an RV in three months. To learn more about items to stock your car with, check out this list of 5 must-have emergency items.

4. Plan your stops

One of the most crucial tips for long road trips is to get out of your car and stretch your legs every two hours or so, our experts suggest. Plan these stops into your long distance drive, whether they fall at mealtimes or can be timed to let you view interesting places.

5. Chew gum

The repetitive process increases circulation and alertness. “You don’t need the sugary kind to get the desired effect,” says Breus, who is a fellow of The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and author of Good Night: The Sleep Doctor’s 4-Week Program to Better Sleep and Better Health.

6. Use good scents

During long distance driving, Breus also recommends keeping a source of peppermint scent nearby. When you feel you need a boost, take a sniff. “It’s a pleasant, all-natural pick-me-up that has been shown to reduce fatigue and increase alertness,” he says.

7. Sit up straight

Make sure your seat is adjusted properly for your body, tilted for maximum blood flow. If you feel a driving “trance” coming on, sit up. “Take a deep breath and scan your body for tension,” says yoga teacher and wellness specialist Elaine Masters, of DrivetimeYoga.com. “If your right hip is feeling sore, for example, lean to the other side.”

8. Keep passengers entertained

Long drives—especially with kids—can often lead to bickering. That kind of aggravation leads to driver fatigue. So make sure children are entertained with books, puzzles, and other time-killing diversions. On the flip side, games such as “find the license plate” are great for keeping everyone engaged with one another.

9. Treat yourself to some sounds

Books on tape help keep the brain active, without creating a dangerous distraction. Breus recommends listening to humorous books or even comedy CDs. “Laughing,” he says, “will keep you awake.”

These tips for long drives can help keep you and your car protected on the road. For more defensive driving tips, check out these 9 safe driving habits you should know.

In addition to safe driving habits, your insurance policy is key to protecting you while driving. Learn more about Nationwide’s auto insurance coverage, including our 24/7 Roadside Assistance option.
by Nationwide.com
Click here for the article







9 Steps to Prepare Your Car for Storage

10 Steps to Prepare Your Car for Storage
How to Prepare Your Car for Storage
If you plan to store your car for a long period time, it’s important to understand your options and learn how to keep the car in good working order.

The last thing you want is to return to a dead battery or a damaged engine. We want to help make sure that doesn’t happen, so we put together a brief overview about how to prepare a car for self-storage.

Types of Car Storage
First, let’s cover what your options are for storage. Below is each unique option and the best scenario for their use:

1. Outdoor Car Storage
When a storage facility advertises outdoor storage, they’re generally offering a paved parking lot for storing your car. This is usually the most affordable option, but it may not be the best option for long-term storage.

2. Covered Car Storage
This option is similar to outside storage, but it offers covered protection with a flat, wide roof. Compared to uncovered storage, covered storage protects against sun and rain. This option is popular for recreational vehicles, like a RV or boat.

3. Indoor Car Storage
If you’re concerned with leaving your car outside, indoor storage is the best option. Plan to store your car long term? Then it’s worth considering an air-cooled or air-conditioned unit as well. This type of ventilated environment will shield your car from all of the harsh elements—including sun, rain, dust, pests and extreme temperatures.

9 Steps to Prepare Your Car for Storage
1. Perform an oil change with a new filter
Once you’ve had an oil change, drive the car for at least 30 minutes. Doing so will dry off any moisture before storing the car.

2. Replace brake fluid and coolant
If you haven’t changed your brake fluid for over a year, drain and refill with fresh fluid before you store the car. The same goes for coolant–replace it if it’s over a year old. If you’re storing a classic car, look for an antifreeze that’s designed for older cars.

3. Disconnect and clean the battery

Disconnect the battery and remove it from the car.
First, clean out the empty section where the battery once was.
Remove any debris and clean well with a baking soda and water solution. We recommend mixing two tablespoons of baking soda with one liter of water.
Use the same solution to clean the battery case and terminals.
Once everything is completely dry, put the battery back in the car and leave it disconnected. This will prevent it from drying while it’s in storage.
4. Prepare your tires
If your car is being stored for more than three months, jack the car up under the front suspension and the rear axle. This will prevent the tires from developing flat spots, which can cause driving vibrations when you retrieve the car. If you’re storing the car for a short period of time, or you don’t want to use a car jack, overfill your tires by ten pounds.

5. Fill up the gas or drain it completely
Fill the gas tank in cars that will be stored for short periods of time. For cars that are being stored for several months or longer, add a stabilizer to the fuel. It’s better to empty the tank completely if you plan to store for a year or more.

6. Take off your windshield wipers
The rubber on windshield wipers can leave residue on your windows after time. Protect your car by placing a piece of plastic between the window and wiper, or just remove the arms completely.

7. Clean and polish the interior and exterior of the car
Pay attention to mud on the undercarriage and any moisture on the inside. Give your car plenty of time to dry before storing it. Again, it’s a good idea to consider an air-cooled or air-conditioned unit to protect the interior fabric and general condition of the car.

8. Plug the exhaust and use a car cover
Make sure you plug any tail pipes (or other holes to the inside) with steel wool or rags to prevent critters from getting inside. This step is most necessary for outside storage, but it never hurts to take preventative measures.

9. Cover your car
The final step is to throw over a car cover or a car bag. If you’re storing an exotic or classic car, consider a car storage bubble instead. Both covers will help protect your car from dirt and dust during its stay.

Ask an expert for help
Being mindful and taking all the necessary steps makes it easy to prepare your vehicle for your storage. If you still feel uneasy about preparing the car on your own, ask an expert for help.

You can use our contact page to speak to a storage expert, or you can use our locations page to find a store near you. Either way, we’d be happy to answer your questions and lead you in the right direction. Our goal is to help you prepare your car, so you can get her back on the road when you’re ready.

Tips on how to store your car
from the dmv





Storing Your Car

By Paul Weissler

You pull into your driveway, take a loving look at the new convertible and realize: Buying it was the fulfillment of a dream. It’s been great fun driving it this summer and fall, but winter is approaching and there’s no way you’re going to drive it on snow and subject it to corrosive road salt–so you face the problem of storing it until late next spring.

A 2- to 4-month driving season followed by eight to 10 months of storage is something many car enthusiasts go through every year. Maybe you’re a snowbird with a pair of vehicles that go into 6-month storage at both your warm- and cold-weather locations during the away season.

Even more traumatic: You’ve got a work assignment or a military posting far from home and can’t bring the car. Whatever the vehicle, the reason and the season, you want to be able to store the vehicle without big expense, yet with minimum deterioration and an easy return to operation.

The Basics
Indoors is always better, particularly for an older vehicle, even if the storage period is summer in the South. If you’re going to be away for up to a couple of years, it definitely has to be kept inside. If you don’t have the place, find an indoor storage facility–it will be money well spent. In fact, you also should get someone to take out the car periodically for an “exercising” drive. If you can’t afford to do long-term storage right, you might have to pay a lot for restoration when you return.

If outdoor “storage” is your only choice, don’t give up. There’s still a lot you can do to minimize the damage, particularly for seasonal storage.

Read the full report by
Popular Mechanics.com






California Driving: A Survival Guide

How to survive — and ultimately enjoy — driving in California!

An informal and unofficial guide to California driving for travelers and tourists, focusing on the information, tips, warnings, etc., about driving and vacationing in California that the official guide books and travel brochures usually don’t give you.

Click here for the infotmation


Don’t be intimidated by the idea of driving through the great California deserts. Compared to driving through the typical Australian, African, or Asian deserts, touring the deserts here by car is usually safe, convenient, and enjoyable, and you’ll see some of the best parts of California, including the Mojave desert, Death Valley, Panamint Valley, the beautiful Mono Lake, and the Owens Valley (at least).

Maybe a third of California is desert, but it’s not necessarily the sort of desert many visitors expect: most of the deserts in California are mountainous, and covered in sage brush and scrub (or Joshua trees), and except for a few spectacular locations like the Eureka Dunes, they’re not the endless sand dunes of the Sahara that some people tend to think of when they hear the word “desert”. Parts of the Californian deserts are even covered in snow in winter, which seems to surprise a lot of visitors.

California’s deserts offer much more than just driving: there’s also hiking, camping, or even just lazing about at a nice hotel or resort (see the Mojave Treks site for some offbeat ideas for places to visit in just the Mojave alone). There are dozens of options from State and National Park campsites, through cheap motels, to expensive resorts; and plenty of package tours cover the whole spectrum from stay-in-the-bus sightseeing to guided off-road four wheel drive convoys. But way off the beaten track, the deserts here are still wild and dangerous, and while most tourists won’t need to worry about that, there are still some rules and common sense things you should consider.

Since most of California’s deserts are crossed by freeways or major highways, a lot of desert driving can be done on good roads with gas, food, water, and accommodation available at convenient locations. Unless you’re really going down obscure back roads or completely off-road, most roads will be paved or fairly good condition gravel; many of the most popular routes across the deserts are actually freeways or highways. Gas stations are usually within easy reach of wherever you are (but gas will usually be more expensive here than in urban and suburban areas). Most of the larger truck stops and small settlements along the highways and freeways will have some sort of cafes and cheap motels as well.

Yucca Tree near Darwin, California
Yucca Tree near Darwin, California

Except during winter, the Californian deserts get really hot, with daily temperatures in the 45 degrees celsius range (I’ve experienced temperatures in Death Valley that were above 50C), and with very low humidity. Death Valley is the hottest place on earth (and one of the driest), and much of the rest of the Mojave is also exceptionally hot. Europeans and Britons by and large will not have much experience with this, so try to remember to protect both yourself and your car:

If you’re uncomfortable with really high temperatures, don’t drive through the desert in summer. Do something else — go on a wine tasting tour of the Napa valley, or go to the beach, or do something a little less likely to give yourself heat stroke. If you have to cross the desert in the summer, stick to the freeways and use an air-conditioned car.
Always carry enough water for you and your passengers to survive in the desert if your car breaks down. If you’re going away from the main roads and tracks, plan on needing three days’ water for each person; otherwise one day is probably sufficient. The amount of water each person uses per day depends on the surrounding temperature and humidity; in the middle of summer I always carry at least a gallon (4 litres) for each person per day; during the rest of the year it’s probably about half that.
Carry additional water for your car’s radiator. California’s deserts are usually mountainous, and your car may have to rise from near sea level to over 8,000′ within a few tens of miles. This can really stress the cooling system on older cars, so be prepared to take it easy and watch the radiator temperature and coolant levels. Some highways and roads have water tanks at strategic places next to the road for this, but don’t count on it.
Your car should be in good condition, reliable, and physically fairly robust. You don’t need any special sort of car in the desert unless you’re going off-road or along some of the worst tracks away from civilization, but you do want to have a car that isn’t going to break down, and that has enough clearance and traction to cope with the smaller dirt roads if you’re leaving the freeways and highways. Don’t attempt to leave the freeways or major highways and roads with a stretch limo, a large RV, or a low-rider, for example.
Try to have a car with air conditioning. Having said this, don’t overwork your car if it’s small or under-powered by using the air conditioning all the time — turn it off while going up steep or long hills, for example.
When you’re off the freeways and major highways, fill up with gas and water whenever you can — don’t just assume the next gas station will be open or that the next settlement even has one. You can never have too much gas or water in the desert.
California’s deserts actually get quite cold during the night; in winter the temperatures can go below freezing. Always carry enough clothing or blankets to keep warm in these conditions (you’d be surprised at the number of tourists who don’t realize this and who end up complaining about the cold nights even during summer!).
If your car breaks down in the desert, stay with it. Don’t wander off away from the car unless it’s to get help from a clearly-visible call box on the road you’re on or an obviously-inhabited building within a few minute’s walk. Any further than this and you have a good chance of never being seen alive again (and if you have any doubts about how far away something is, don’t leave your car). Try to find some shade near the car, or try to stay in the shade of your car, and don’t waste energy and water with unnecessary movement or exertion. This advice holds for break-downs anywhere in the desert, whether on the side of a major freeway or off the beaten track. If you do leave your car, make sure it’s not in the way of other traffic, lock it, and leave a clearly-visible note under the windshield spelling out who you are, where you’re headed, and when you left. Do this whether you’re leaving because a passing traveler has just offered you a ride into the nearest town so you can call the AAA, or because you’ve just given up after a few hour’s waiting and have stupidly decided to walk the 60 miles back to Barstow on your own. The less well-traveled a particular route is the more likely it is that a passing vehicle will stop and offer assistance. The corollary to this is that if you come across a breakdown or accident in the middle of nowhere, you should be prepared to help as best you can.
No matter what car you’re driving, learn how to change the tires and wheels on your own, and always ensure that the spare tire has the correct air pressure in it (and get an accurate pocket air pressure meter). If it’s a rental car, make sure it’s actually got a spare tire and wheel and associated tools, and you know how to use them. If you’re going deep into the back country and the car you’re driving has those anti-theft lock nuts or studs on the wheels, replace them with normal nuts or studs if you can — the only time I’ve ever been in serious trouble was (early on in my desert driving experiences) when one of my tires went flat and the little attachment to undo the anti-theft lock nuts failed miles from anywhere down a desert mining trail, and I was simply unable to get the wheel off the car with the any of my normal tools (I got back to civilisation by using the instant repair stuff mentioned below combined with stopping literally every mile and pumping the slowly-deflating tire back up again with an electric pump; I did this for about thirty miles, some twenty of which were along a steep, narrow, deeply-rutted dirt track. It took forever). And remember, changing a wheel in the desert can be difficult if you’re surrounded by sand or unstable ground — bring strong flat wooden boards to put under the jack so it doesn’t sink into the sand (the boards don’t have to be especially big, but they do need to be strong enough that the jack won’t go through them, and wide enough that they don’t either sink or tilt in loose dirt or sand). Even better, if you’re going down a desert or mountain back road, learn how to repair (or at least temporarily patch) a flat tire well enough to get you back to a main road. Nothing’s going to repair a large gash or torn side wall, of course, but smaller holes and leaks can be dealt with well enough to get you back on the road if your spare tire is also flat or already in use. Get an electric air pump that will plug into the 12 volt supply (the lighter socket, in most cases) and that can pump quickly enough to overcome slow leaks (smaller pumps are almost useless — get a small truck pump). Those flat repair / canned air things you can buy at car places are also actually fairly useful (if you’ve got enough of them), but not because of the air — the repair liquid / goo stuff does actually do some good in my experience by greatly slowing the air loss for smaller holes, but you also often need to keep stopping and pumping the tire back up every few miles with the electric pump because the goo isn’t entirely effective. The tire repair kits that come with the tools that let you put a flexible plug into holes are also really useful, but, again, only if you also have a reasonable pump, the hole is small, and you know how to use the repair kit.
If you’re going off-road or into the real wilderness, consider renting a satellite phone. You may never need it, but the $50 you paid for it to be with you for a week may be the best investment you ever made — mobile phone coverage is non-existent off the main freeways and highways (and spotty even there) in the deserts, and if your car’s just broken down or you’ve had a serious accident in the middle of nowhere, the phone may save your life (I used to rent one for most desert trips, but then I’m not usually anywhere near places with reliable mobile phone coverage). Alternatively get something like the DeLorme inReach — this will also pay for itself if you ever get into any real trouble away from mobile phone coverage. Yes, I have one; it’s basically replaced the satellite phone for desert driving.
Again, if you’re going to be going to obscure places you’ve never seen before and that are miles from the nearest busy road, get a GPS. I don’t mean one of those city navigator apps on your iPhone (although they’re helpful and I always have one somewhere in the car on longer trips), I mean a reliable hand-held unit that you can use not only to work out where you are and where to go, but that allows you to tell other people where you are (when you’re using the satellite phone to call in a breakdown, for example), and whose batteries don’t die after only a few hours of use. It must at least be able to give you full latitude and longitude readout, maintain a trail so you can backtrack, and you should keep it on you at all times when you’re away from the car. And don’t forget to mark the car’s position on the GPS before you walk away from the car for that nice little stroll up Mt. Ubehebe or to that abandoned lead mine you can see just across that dry river bed over there…
Sidewinder Road newer Barstow, California
Sidewinder Road near Barstow, California

Unless you’re in a hurry, don’t blindly stick to the freeways — there are lots of good roads that parallel or take more scenic back-country routes away from the freeways. For example, Interstate 40 between Barstow and Kingman (Arizona) parallels the old Route 66 highway, an authentic American historical treasure. You’ll see a lot more driving along this part of the old Route 66 (now known as the “National Trails Highway”) than you would if you just go straight down I-40: you’ll be able to stop next to the road pretty much wherever you like, look at the scenery, take photos, or just walk around and explore the ghost towns and the natural landscape (there are volcanic craters, sand dunes, dry lake beds, etc. all within walking distance of the road).

Don’t be put off by the relative remoteness of the area and the apparent lack of traffic on some of these roads — most roads that are marked on an average California desert road map are well-enough traveled that if you do get into trouble, someone is likely to come along within an hour or two (the CHP, for example, patrols the old Route 66 at least once or twice a day).

On the other hand, don’t blindly take just any old route away from the freeways or highways. Unless you’re pretty sure the road is good (for example a reliable map of the area marks it suitable for the sort of car you’re driving), or you know you’ve got enough gas to turn around and come back from any point along the way if the road turns out to be too much for your car, don’t go down a side road or track without asking locals about it (and always take their advice with a grain of salt). Similarly, if you don’t know how to read a map or navigate using topographical information, don’t go off-road or away from the major marked roads. Always make sure you understand the map you’re using, that it’s up-to-date and accurate, and that you really are where you think you are when you’re using it. Again, a good in-car or hand-held GPS can be a real help here.

* * *

For one person’s view of the California desert done over the past twenty or more years, check out my The Desert gallery on Hamish Reid Photography, or the videos below (Drive-by: Desert and Drive-by: Yucca Forest). But note that due to annoying copyright restrictions (that soundtrack…), the first video (Drive-by: Desert) may not be visible in certain countries or on certain devices (and / or may be plagued by ads). Both the gallery and the Drive-by: Desert video are experienced (or jaundiced) looks at some of the realities of the California desert, good and bad (and definitely won’t be everyone’s cup of tea); the Yucca forest video celebrates the desert.









261
California Legislature passes 12-cent gas tax hike

Read all about it & pay at the pump.

Registration Related Fees

Registration Related Fees

Handheld wireless telephone

Motorists will soon be prohibited from holding and operating a handheld wireless telephone or electronic communications devices while driving, unless it mounted on the vehicle’s windshield, or affixed to a dashboard or center console in a way that does not hinder the individual’s view of the road, according to the release.

Lane splitting

The law, which goes into effect Jan. 1, defines the practice as a motorist driving a two-wheeled motorcycle between rows of stopped or moving vehicles. It also authorizes the California Highway Patrol to develop educational guidelines on lane splitting to help ensure the safety of all motorists.

Adobe Tinging 29 Palms, car and trucks window tinting, open every day. ... 760-218-6945

Vehicle Registration Fee Increase

Starting April 1, the vehicle registration fee on every vehicle or trailer coach will rise to $53, an increase of $10. The increase is part of Senate Bill 838.

and there is More.
New 2017 California Traffic-Related Laws to Go Into Effect on Jan 1.







About Trucks

Adobe Tinting 29 Palms, car and truck window tinting service.



2017 Pickup Truck of the Year – How We Test
The Science Behind The Trophy
Jason Gonderman – Feb 14, 2017

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From the outside, our Pickup Truck of the Year testing may look like a bunch of ruffians doing burnouts and donuts for a week. However, in reality that couldn’t be further from the truth. Sure, some juvenile shenanigans take place for the sake of photography, but what isn’t seen are the many hundreds of hours of work that go on behind the scenes. We’ll save you the details of the thousands of pages of paperwork and hours on the phone with various state, federal, and private organizations and get right to the nitty-gritty.
Testing began before any of the pickups ever hit the highway under our control. Upon delivery, our staff at our Truck Trend world headquarters weighed each vehicle. We utilize a set of precision vehicle scales from ProForm that are capable of accurately weighing pickups in excess of 7,000 pounds. We do this for several reasons: the first being that manufacturer-published curb weights typically don’t account for trim-level variations. This often leads to a discrepancy of many hundreds of pounds. For the most accurate testing possible, we calculate available payload based on the published gross vehicle weight rating and our determined actual curb weight (empty vehicle, with a full tank of fuel). We find that about half of all pickups tested actually have less available payload than published, mostly due to the manufacturers using a blanket number and not accounting for those option variations mentioned earlier.

With the full judging staff assembled for a week of intense testing, the team headed to the Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California, for a day of instrumented testing. The field of eight was subjected to 0-60-mph and quarter-mile acceleration testing as well as 60-0-mph braking while unladen. Each truck was then loaded up with its maximum payload and retested from 0-60, for quarter-mile elapsed time, and 60-0 braking. The final instrumented test involved each truck accelerating from 0-60 mph and through a quarter-mile while towing 75 percent of its rated trailer capacity. For this testing, we utilize asphalt pavement that most closely simulates what you would find in the real world. Payload is simulated using rubber mats that weigh 100 pounds apiece and are loaded in the bed of each pickup. We load the trucks 200 pounds short of our calculated maximum payload in order to account for the weight of the driver.
The trailer is weighted in the same fashion with our rubber ballast mats and weight is set with approximately 10 percent of weight on the tongue. We settled on testing at 75 percent of rated maximum as we feel this is the sweet spot of where most owners who tow regularly would. Rated maximums are also checked using our determined curb weight and the manufacturers’ stated gross combined vehicle weight ratings. Unlike payload ratings, however, these are very rarely found to be out of spec. While instrumented testing was being conducted, each judge had the opportunity to drive each pickup with its full payload on a closed course. This allowed for testing vehicle handling with maneuvers that would otherwise be dangerous on public roads, such as panic braking and emergency lane changes.





Adobe Tinting 29 Palms about trucks, pickup trucks.






An Illustrated History of the Pickup Truck

It would be hard to argue that any type of vehicle is more uniquely American than the pickup truck. Once the most basic of basic transportation, embraced only by farmers and tradespeople, pickups today are often as likely to be loaded up with options as cargo, and they have become the personal transportation of millions of individuals and families—many of whom never burden their trucks with more than a few bags of groceries or a bicycle or two. America’s love affair with the pickup has blossomed to the point where the bestselling vehicle in the U.S. is the Ford pickup, and it’s been that way for 35 years.

As trucks’ popularity has grown, so has the variety of models and equipment available, enabling buyers to choose anything from a basic work truck to a rugged off-roader to a four-door family hauler to feature-laden models with all the comforts of a luxury car. Ram alone offers 12 different trim levels, and all the major manufacturers let buyers choose among at least three different cab sizes, several bed lengths, and two- or four-wheel drive. Here’s a look at some of the milestone models that have led to the choices we have today.
By Jim Travers | Photo by the Manufacturers

The First Pickup

Henry Ford gets the credit for both the first factory-built pickup truck and for coining the term “pickup.” The 1925 Model T Roadster with Pickup Body was created when Ford saw an opportunity to cash in on the fact that many farmers were either modifying the famously simple and rugged Model T automobiles for work in their fields or just using them as is. Henry himself, it is said, had a 1912 Model T with a cargo box on his own farm, and coachbuilders and Ford dealers alike had been offering pickup bodies for years before the factory got on the bandwagon. By the time the pickup version arrived, the venerable Model T was approaching obsolescence, and it was replaced in 1928 by the larger and more powerful Model A. Still, Ford sold somewhere around 135,000 Model T pickups, beginning an American love story and putting untold numbers of horses out of work.
By Jim Travers

History of the Pickup truck by Car and Driver.com



Pickup Truck History:

Featuring Authors Don Bunn & Paul McLaughlin

As we start the 21st century, PickupTruck.Com is proud to present an exclusive series you won’t find anywhere else on the Internet: The Pickup Truck Chronicles – A History of the Pickup Truck in America.
Over the next 6 months, we are going to bring you a new chapter each week until we have completely chronicled the history of the Big Three Auto Manufacturers (Chevy, Ford, and Dodge) and their role in producing the pickup truck.

PickupTruck.Com has teamed up with Don Bunn, the well-known Dodge truck historian, and Paul McLaughlin, a Ford truck aficionado since the 1950s and popular Ford author. To learn more about Messrs. Bunn and McLaughlin click here.

We hope you enjoy this series as PickupTruck.Com makes every effort to supply our community with the material our members want to see.

Segment One: 1918 to 1928 Dodge Brother Pickups

Author: Don Bunn
The title for this segment is somewhat misleading. During the eleven years the original Dodge Brothers Company built trucks they offered only one pickup – a 3/4 ton from 1924 through 1927. This era of Dodge truck history in reality is the story of two companies – the Dodge Brothers Company and the Graham Brothers Company.

The Dodge Brothers built the first automobile with their name on it in 1914 as a 1915 model. Previously the brothers had built all the mechanical parts for the first 500,000 Ford Model T cars. The Dodge Brothers were well known and highly respected in the automotive industry because of the work they had done for Ford, Oldsmobile, and other leading auto manufacturers.

This World War I Dodge Brother’s half-ton Army truck had a body built by the Budd Co. It rode on a 114-inch wheelbase chassis and was powered by the famous Dodge Brothers 212 cubic inch 35 horsepower four cylinder engine. (John Zentmyer)
From the very beginning Dodge cars sold exceedingly well. The Dodge brothers positioned their car up market from Ford’s Model T. It was bigger, had more features, and cost more. Even though many of their satisfied customers begged them to, the brothers adamantly refused to offer a light-duty truck simply because they couldn’t meet the red hot demand for automobiles. Late in World War I when the government asked they readily agreed to supply almost 20,000 half-ton chassis cowls, cargo trucks, light repair trucks, and ambulances.
After the war ended, as a 1918 model, the military ambulance was converted to the famous Dodge Brothers half-ton Screenside Commercial Car. The Screenside was built on a beefed up 114-inch wheelbase automobile chassis. It was rated for a maximum payload of 1,000 lbs. (half-ton) and used the auto’s 212 cubic inch, 35 horsepower, four cylinder engine and the auto’s three speed transmission. Approximately six months after launching the Screenside the half-ton was added to the commercial car line. Think of the panel as an enclosed screenside with double rear cargo doors. These two models were the only trucks the original Dodge Brothers Company built between 1918 and 1928. They were upgraded to a 3/4-ton payload rating (1,500 lbs.) in 1923 and their wheelbases were lengthened to 116-inches in 1924.

The first civilian Dodge Brothers’ Commercial was the famous Screenside introduced in 1917 as a 1918 model. It was built on a 114-inch wheelbase chassis and was powered by the 35 horsepower 212 cubic inch Dodge four cylinder engine. (DaimlerChrysler)

Dodge Brothers’ famous Commercial Panel followed six months later after the Screenside. It had the same wheelbase length, payload, engine, and 3-speed transmission as the Screenside. (DaimlerChrysler)

Dodge Brothers Company entered into an agreement with the Graham Brothers Company in 1921 whereby the Grahams would manufacture one and 1 1/2-ton trucks from mechanical parts supplied by Dodge and with cabs and bodies manufactured in the Graham’s plants. The Grahams were able to offer an extensive range of wheelbases, cabs, and bodies to exactly suit the buyer’s specifications. These trucks were sold exclusively through Dodge Brothers dealers.

The 1924 3/4-ton Dodge Brothers’ pickup was actually built by the Graham Brothers. Very little is known about this truck. I have never seen one nor have I heard that one exists. In four years less than 2,400 were built. It had a load space 71-inches long by 44.5-inches wide and 12.5-inches high. The tailgate was provided with chains to support it in a parallel position. Its cab and body were constructed entirely of wood reinforced with metal straps.

(Left) To the best of my knowledge a factory photo of the 1924 3/4-ton pickup does not exist. This picture was taken from the 1924 pickup’s sales literature. The open cab was constructed of wood as was the cargo box. A closed cab was offered. Its drivetrain was the same as the Screenside / Panel. (uncredited)

(Right) Graham Brothers built a one-ton pickup (shown) and a 1 1/2 ton pickup in 1925. The one ton model BB with a closed cab as shown sold for $1,345. It’s wheelbase was 130-inches, it was powered by the 212 cubic inch four cylinder Dodge Brothers engine mated to a 3-speed transmission. Its payload rating was 2,000 lbs. Its pickup body model number was 253 and the closed cab model number was 205. (uncredited)

Graham Brothers built a one-ton pickup (shown) and a 1 1/2 ton pickup in 1925. The one ton Model BB with a closed cab as shown sold for $1,345. It’s wheelbase was 130-inches, it was powered by the 212 cubic inch four cylinder Dodge Brothers engine mated to a 3-speed transmission. Its payload rating was 2,000 lbs. Its pickup body model number was 253 and the closed cab model number was 205. (Don Bunn)

Click here for the full history of the American Pickup Truck







Western Feature John Wayne Stagecoach Race


VS Western Feature, ORIGINAL SOUND, Crowd of cowboys gathering at finish line, Officials in top hats on dais. VS CU John Wayne / Cowboy driving stagecoach. VS Close contest between two racing stagecoaches. CU Two cowboy’s holding on, driving stagecoach. Stagecoaches crossing finish line, cheering crowd, waving hats.

Early Travel

Travel in colonial days in North America, when not by water or on foot, was chiefly on horseback. Even after carriages of various sorts were introduced, many people continued to prefer horse and saddle for their traveling. In many areas outside the towns, the roads were practically impassable for carriages during much of the year. Horse and rider, encountering unexpected obstructions, could act with more freedom and therefore move with greater speed and certainly than a vehicle. Also, horseback travel was less expensive—a weighty consideration for ordinary people of limited means. (3)

In Virginia during the eighteenth century, four-wheeled carriages such as the coach and chariot became the fashionable vehicle of the gentry, and two-wheeled carriages such as riding chairs and chaises were commonly owned by gentry and working people alike. However, most people, of the common sort, had no access to traveling vehicles whatsoever. (4)

Carriage ownership for the State of Virginia, as reflected in the Personal Property Tax Records of 1790, was only 3.3 carriages per 1000 population. This figure varied significantly depending upon the many factors associated with the particular area being examined. In the Tidewater area the average was 6.1 carriages per 1000 population. In the Shenandoah Valley and the areas beyond the Allegheny Crest the averages were 0.6 and 0.04 per 1000 population respectively. The counties of Accomack and Northampton on the Eastern Shore of Virginia present an interesting example that is considered an anomaly. In these two counties carriage ownership (primarily two-wheeled carriages) was 13 per 1000 population, more than double the
Stage Waggons and Coaches Stage Waggons and Coachees Ron Vineyard



About Window Tinting,
Autos, Trucks,
Tips & How to do it.
29 Palms Adobe Tinting.

About Window Tinting, Autos, Trucks, Tips & How to do it. 29 Palms Adobe Tinting.



Calif. window tinting laws

California Window Tinting Laws click here for source

Car window tinting laws in California were enacted in 1999. We have provided all the necessary information about your car’s window tint, including how dark or reflective the tint is allowed in your state. There are also additional car window tinting rules and regulations in California so make sure you read all about it below.
Window tint darkness in California
The percent of visible light allowed through your car windows is called VLT: Visible Light Transmission. The percentage of light allowed through your film and glass in California is very specific and different for sedan cars and SUV cars or vans.

Tint darkness for sedans:
Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed on the top 4 inches of the windshield.
Front Side windows: Must allow more than 88% of light in.
Back Side windows: Any darkness can be used.
Rear Window: Any darkness can be used.
Tint darkness for SUV and vans:
Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed on the top 4 inches of the windshield.
Front Side windows: Must allow more than 88% of light in.
Back Side windows: Any darkness can be used.
Rear Window: Any darkness can be used.
Window tint reflection in California
Window tint can reflect incoming light and reduce glare and heat. California window tint law permits a certain window reflection when using a tint so make sure you pay attention to this as well.

Tint reflection for sedans:
Front Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Back Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Tint reflection for SUV and vans:
Front Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Back Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Other California window tint rules and regulations:
California does have several other important laws, rules and regulations pertaining to window tinting. They include the following:

Side Mirrors: Dual side mirrors are required if the rear window is tinted.
Restricted Colors: California tint laws do not permit using red, amber or blue tint colors. Side windows must be colorless.
Certificates: Manufacturers of film do need to certify the film they sell in the state and the driver is required to have the certificate in his/her possession.
Stickers: State law does require a certificate or a sticker from the installing company and the manufacturer’s name and address.
Medical Exceptions: California law doesn’t allow any medical exemptions that would allow you use special tint.
Keep in mind that California tinting laws and regulations may be interpreted differently in your county or place of residence and we always recommend you double-check our information with your local DMV or law enforcement authorities.






7 Reasons to Get Your Windows Tinted
By Mitchell Schaffer

7 Reasons to Get Your Windows Tinted By Mitchell Schaffer

Window tinting has become a very important part of our business over the past several years. Let’s face it, it makes your vehicle look better. Many of our customers have their windows tinted for visual appeal, but there are many other reasons to consider having a high-quality film applied to your windows. I will outline the 7 top reasons to consider a film application:

Decrease Interior Heat – Quality window film can provide up to a 78% reduction in heat transfer. This reduces the sun’s effect of heating up the inside of your car decreasing the amount of time that you will need to use your air conditioner. This can result in extending the life of the vehicle’s AC system.
Energy Savings – As stated above, reducing interior heat can reduce the demand for AC use. This can have a significant impact on gas mileage and a savings at the pump. who wouldn’t want that?
Reduce Interior Fading – Quality film can block up to 99% of UV ray. This help to reduce fading of your seats, carpets, dash and wood trim. It also works to extend the life of these items.
Reduce Health Risks – Exposure to the sun is known to cause potential health risks to the eyes and skin. By blocking 99% of UV light, window film will also act as a “sunscreen” to protect from the harmful effects of the sun.
Reduces Hazardous Glare – Glare while driving can blind vision and create a dangerous condition. Window film applied to a vehicle’s side and rear windows can significantly reduce glare.
Increase Safety and Security – Accidents can turn a window into thousands of dangerous shards of glass. Window film can act to hold the glass together during an accident. It can also impede a would-be thief from gaining access to your vehicle.
Enhance Appearance – Most shops offer varying shades of window film to appeal to almost any taste. If you do not want to darken the windows, but still want the benefits listed above, we have a film for that too!

7 Reasons to Get Your Windows Tinted By Mitchell Schaffer






Pickup Truck Ranked from Worst to Best
Truckin’: Every Full-Size Pickup Truck Ranked from Worst to Best

Pickups haven’t always led such a charmed life. Back in the dark ages, when trucks were the sole province of tradesmen, farmers, and other commercially minded operators, looks and luxury weren’t part of the plan. But a few decades back, the buying public began to see the beauty in the rugged utility they offered, and sales took off as more folks adopted them as their daily vehicles.

Now, of course, pickups are routinely the top-selling vehicles of any calendar year, and manufacturers have engaged in a nonstop trend of adding features, capability, and technology. To keep tabs on the ever-evolving segment, we grab seat time in and strap our test gear to the latest pickups at every available opportunity. The competition has never been fiercer—so buckle up.
By Andrew Wendler

Truckin’: Every Full-Size Pickup Truck Ranked from Worst to Best





Top 6 Fuel-Efficient Pickups
by Jeffrey Archer for

Top 6 Fuel-Efficient Pickups, good article


Although many consumers believe buying a truck for towing or hauling means sacrificing fuel economy, we think good gas mileage and traditional pickup truck capabilities aren’t mutually exclusive. To prove it, we’ve compiled a list of six pickups that achieve great fuel economy and can still handle your chores, whether they include off-roading, heavy-duty towing, hauling materials to a job site or just cruising around town.

Chevrolet Colorado Crew Cab 4WD

Although Chevrolet’s base-level four-cylinder single-cab Colorado may seem tempting due to its low price and great gas mileage, we’d skip the midsize truck’s two-seat models and go straight for the four-wheel drive Crew Cab. That’s because four-wheel drive Crew Cab variants of the Colorado trade the truck’s lethargic inline four for a powerful 3.5-liter five-cylinder, which provides a satisfying 242 horsepower – and, despite the power bump, only a slight efficiency penalty versus the 185-horsepower four-cylinder. The five-cylinder is also no stranger to workhorse duty, thanks to a 4,000-pound towing capacity and a robust 242 pound-feet of torque.

Chevrolet Silverado Hybrid

Although hybrid versions of Chevrolet’s Silverado pickup and its GMC Sierra twin have never sold in huge numbers, there’s no denying that the full-size trucks are great on gas. Although the pickups’ EPA rating of 20 miles per gallon in the city and 23 mpg on the highway aren’t up to the standards set by some hybrid cars, the figures are impressive considering the pickups don’t use a tiny four- or six-cylinder but rather a brawny 332-horsepower 6.0-liter V8. That puts the most efficient Silverado and Sierra models among the pickups’ best performers – and their 6,000-pound towing capacity means they’re no slouch when the discussion turns to heavy-duty use, either.

Ford F-150 with EcoBoost

It’s hard to deny the impact Ford’s turbocharged EcoBoost engine has on the full-size pickup market. For the first time ever, truck buyers have access to an engine that achieves eight-cylinder power and torque – 365 horsepower and 420 pound-feet at just 2,500 rpm – yet impressive six-cylinder fuel economy of 16 miles per gallon in the city and 22 mpg on the highway. The fact that the muscular powerplant costs less than $1,300 extra in most configurations is icing on the cake – and it leaves us wondering why anyone would opt for the truck’s 5.0-liter V8, which offers less power and less torque while consuming more fuel.

Honda Ridgeline

Honda’s midsize Ridgeline is an easy inclusion on any list of fuel-efficient pickups. Capable of towing an impressive 5,000 pounds, the car-based Ridgeline features a standard 3.5-liter V6 that produces 250 horsepower and achieves fuel economy ratings of up to 21 miles per gallon in highway driving. While the Ridgeline is no heavy-duty machine, it’s great for around-town driving – and its innovative, well-designed bed should put it near the top of the list for any city dweller interested in a pickup “just because.” With more than eight inches of ground clearance, it’s also capable of tackling the occasional off-road trail.

Ram 3500 HD

Although heavy-duty pickups like the Ram 3500, Chevrolet Silverado HD and Ford F-Series Super Duty don’t have to submit to EPA fuel economy tests due to their size, many truck shoppers believe the Ram’s Cummins diesel is among the most robust, fuel-efficient heavy duty truck engines on the market. With a strong 350 horsepower and an eye-popping 650 pound-feet of torque available at just 1,500 rpm, the engine is certainly potent – but it’s hard to believe such an enormous engine could also achieve good gas mileage. Nonetheless, in spite of its big numbers, most reviewers report around 15 miles per gallon in mixed city and highway driving – not bad for an engine that motivates the Ram 3500 to tow nearly 23,000 pounds.

Toyota Tacoma

Although many pickups boast strong gas mileage figures, no truck offers the all-out fuel efficiency of the four-cylinder Toyota Tacoma. Among the most dependable trucks on the planet, four-cylinder Tacoma models equipped with the pickup’s standard manual transmission can achieve an EPA-rated 21 miles per gallon in the city and a whopping 25 mpg on the highway. Sure, the small truck doesn’t offer stellar towing capacity – and with just 159 horsepower, it’s no stoplight racer. But in the realm of small pickups that offer great mileage and bulletproof reliability, the Tacoma is king of the hill – especially considering its starting price of around $17,000 including destination.
Top 6 Fuel-Efficient Pickups, good article
What it means to you: Just because you’re buying a truck doesn’t mean you need to sacrifice at the pump.



Kelley Blue Book Best Buys of 2017: Pickup Truck
By KBB.com Editors

The country’s best-selling vehicle just keeps getting better
For a third year in a row, the Ford F-150 sets the benchmark for pickups with its blend of capability, competence and innovation, all available in a wide range of models for every budget. It would be easy, understandable even, for the F-150 to rest on its laurels. After all, it was just two years ago that Ford took the bold step to remake America’s best-selling vehicle into a lean but mean aluminum-intensive machine. The moved raised eyebrows, but naysayers can’t say much as F-150 sales continue to power past the competition.
Innovative powertrain
The 2017 Ford F-150 again marches into new territory with a powertrain that is both more powerful and more efficient. The latest innovation comes from pairing Ford’s 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 engine with a 10-speed automatic transmission, the first such gear-changer on a production vehicle. The engine it’s connected to also gets an upgrade, with 10 more horsepower (for a total of 375) and a significant increase in torque from 420 lb-ft to 470 units. With these impressive figures comes another: the ability to tow up to 12,200 pounds.
The extra grunt from this revamped powertrain made short work of the kind of duties expected from a truck, namely towing and hauling. In our tests of each, the Ford barely noticed the extra weight. Even city slickers will appreciate the F-150’s ability to hold a gear while descending a steep highway, enabling the truck to maintain its speed and drivers to keep their cool.
Everyday driver
As the best-selling vehicle in America for decades, it’s little surprise that countless families and individuals use Ford’s pickup as a daily driver, not just a work vehicle. Here, too, the F-150 adeptly obliges. As an everyday vehicle, the F-150 is surprisingly competent. While its inherent size will never make it as nimble as a sedan or a smaller pickup, the Ford tends to drive smaller than it actually is.
The same powertrains that make the Ford F-150 so capable for hauling also enable effortless power for acceleration and passing. This is especially true of the two twin-turbocharged V6 options, both of which feel more like a V8. (For buyers still craving a naturally aspirated V8, a 5.0-liter is still available, as is a 3.5-liter V6 that acts as the base engine on lower trims.)
Amenities and driving aids galore
Today’s F-150 is a far different breed than your father’s work truck. While the under-$30,000 base models are still pretty basic, that all changes as you climb trims and check the options boxes.
Who’d have thought that today’s truck buyer could get amenities like massaging front seats, heated rear seats, power-operated foldout running boards and remote tailgate release? Or even safety and driving aids like adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring and Ford’s Pro Trailer Backup Assist that guides the trailer to the left or right with the twist of a knob? And like other vehicles in Ford’s lineup, the 2017 F-150 gets an infotainment boost with a Sync 3 system that is both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatible. It all adds up to a truck that easily works like a truck, yet is just as happy to play the role of sophisticated family hauler.
More 2017 Ford F-150
Build and price your own F-150 to unlock its Fair Purchase Price, 5-Year Cost to Own and more, or check out our full, in-depth review.
Inside and Out: 2017 Ford F-150

read full article click here





Top 7 Brand New Pickup Trucks for 2017: Counted Down







Best 3 Pickup Trucks 2017






Old Dale, Joshua Tree & Berdoo Canyon Road
NotaRubicon Productions


Published on Jan 18, 2016
The NotARubicon rode with “The Desert Outlaw” and a group of about 25 Jeeps and 4x4s. We started in 29 Palms, drove through the Old Dale Mining District via Gold Crown Road, through Joshua Tree / Pinto Basin, across Geology Tour Road and finally through Berdoo Canyon. This run was “easy” and was mostly flat dirt road but there were a few rocky areas and fun hills to play on.






4-Wheel Trail Driving Tips

Text & Photos by Len Wilcox

aking a sport utility vehicle off-highway can be a tremendous adventure — but it can also be a complete disaster, unless you first take the time to prepare yourself and your vehicle for the trail. Here are a few tips to help make your trip a fun, safe experience that you’ll want to repeat.

Rule number one is always be prepared. The desert can be a dangerous and lonely place, if you find yourself stuck or broke down and without help. Take a look at our emergency supply list, and add other things you might need.

Another good rule is to always know where you are, and where you’re going. Take good maps along, and consider getting a GPS. In addition to maps, DesertUSA has several excellent guidebooks that will help you find some interesting and scenic trails.

You should always let someone know where you are going, and set a time to contact them to let them know you are okay. If you do get lost or break down, then the people at home should know when and where to start looking. That person should have the phone number of the nearest sheriff, Park Service or BLM office (depending on who has jurisdiction over the land you’re traveling on; if in doubt, call the sheriff), and know to call them if you do not check back on time. And don’t forget to call them when you return; you don’t want a rescue team out looking for you while you’re resting at a camp or in a hotel room somewhere.

Another important element is to be aware of the damage you and your vehicle can do to the desert environment. We all need to Tread Lightly. The first reason is, we are all visitors in someone else’s home when we’re out on the desert; be aware that many animals live above, on and under the sands, and we don’t really have a right to destroy their homes. And, there is constant pressure from environmental groups to close these wonderful lands to all vehicle access. So it is in our own best interests to not give them a reason by tearing up the desert.

Off-Road Guidelines
Don’t blaze a new trail; stay on the established path. The ruts made by your tires may be left behind for years, even decades, as an example of a thoughtless 4-wheeler, and may be used in photographs and publications as a good reason to close off the land. Plus, the weight of your vehicle might crush some of the multitudes of tunnels and tiny excavations of field mice, kangaroo rats and so on. These ruts may also cause erosion.

Don’t litter – not even a cigarette butt or a candy wrapper. If you pack it in, pack it out. Trash doesn’t rot on the desert like it does in wet environments; once it’s there, it’s there for a very long time.

Don’t spin your tires and chew up the soil – it breaks the surface crust and leads to erosion. If you need to pile stones up to get over an obstacle, then put the stones back where you found them afterwards.

Don’t disturb the wildlife. Leave desert tortoises and other critters where they are; you are visiting their home, and chances are good they really don’t want to leave it for yours.

Slow down and enjoy the scenery; you’re out here to have fun, not to spend your day repairing damage you wouldn’t have done if you’d driven a little slower.

Desert Driving Tips
If you want to get off the pavement and onto the sand, you need 4-wheel-drive, and the tougher, the better. Whatever vehicle you choose to drive out there, make sure it’s in good condition, has good trail tires and is ready for the trail. Your vehicle is your lifeline in and out of the desert. Do a complete vehicle check before leaving, and make sure all of your fluids are topped off and your tires are ready for the trip.
Driving technique is equally important. There are some basic tips; first is drive slow and easy. You’ll damage tires, break things, run over desert tortoises and lose out on experiences if you try to drive too fast.

Second, stay on top of, not in, the ruts (except in sand, of course; when driving in sand I try to keep the wheels where the sand is best packed from the previous vehicles).
Put your vehicle in 4-wheel drive before you need it, and shift to low range early to reduce the strain on your vehicle.

When in deep sand, keep your speed up and use higher gears; don’t spin the tires, and don’t stop till you’re clear of it. If you get stuck in sand, try letting some of the air out of your tires (remember to air them up again as soon as you can). After digging out the sand that is blocking your tires, you can use a piece of wood, some canvas or (if no other choice) some brush for traction. If you have plenty of water available you might try moistening the sand in front of your tires.

When you’re approaching a hill, don’t just rush into it blindly — look it over, and realize the road might make a sharp turn just when you can’t see anything but your hood.

Another good rule: remember that any hill you go down you may also have to come back up. If you don’t think you can come back up it, don’t go down unless there is another clear and obvious trail out. You will occasionally encounter other vehicles on the trail. Just as on the street, you should stay right to avoid oncoming traffic, if you can. If it is safer to move left instead of right, then by all means do so; the rule of common sense applies. If there is only room for one vehicle to pass, the more maneuverable vehicle, or the more experienced driver, should give way.

When two vehicles meet on a grade and there isn’t a safe place to pull over, the vehicle traveling uphill has the right of way. It is safer for the vehicle traveling downhill to back up, and it will be much easier for the downhill vehicle to get under way.

Remember that what may look like a short trip on the map may take many hours in 4-wheel drive — so allow enough time for safe travel. Also, know that a short trip by car can be a day-long hike. Plan accordingly; if you break down you may need to hike out if help doesn’t come along in a reasonable time.

If you do get lost, stuck, or if you break down:

Stay with your vehicle or otherwise make yourself visible.

Keep calm — don’t panic and don’t waste time on the ‘if’ word (‘If only I hadn’t done that’). It’s wasted effort, you did it, or it happened, whatever. Spend your time constructively.

Think through your options. Take stock of your supplies and situation.

Stay put, unless you have a clear and specific destination.

If you choose to hike out, avoid walking during the heat of the day; morning and evening walking is better for conserving your body’s moisture. If you must leave your vehicle, leave a note telling the direction of your travel, your destination, and the date and time you left.

Seek shelter from the elements, but try to make yourself visible (with smoke or a signal fire, or a brightly colored tarp).

What can happen if you leave your car.

Emergency Supplies
Aside from the usual tools, spare tire, jack and so on, carry enough food and camping equipment to stay alive and relatively comfortable for several days in adverse conditions. I keep my emergency stores in a plastic carton in the garage, ready to be loaded first when I’m getting ready to hit the trail. In that carton are these supplies:

First aid kit – includes a snake bite kit (be sure to replace the rubber suction cups each spring), suntan lotion, insect bite spray, burn ointment, ace bandage, iodine, bandages and Band-Aids.

Heat tablets – There’s not much wood on the desert.

MRE’s – they really aren’t too bad if you’re hungry enough. Army surplus stores have them. Spare compass, flashlight (check the batteries before you go), matches, pocketknife, spare blanket – one of those tiny aluminum emergency blankets (space blankets) you’ll find in the sporting goods section.

A small shovel, a towrope, and two 2-foot-long boards in case I get stuck.

Camping and emergency tools: aerial or road flares, rope or cord, duct tape, electrician’s tape, small tarp or ground cover. I carry lots of fluids – usually a gallon of water per person, plus an ice chest with Gatorade.

And, I take a cell phone. They work in many of the remote desert areas.

I also take along maps – usually two or three of the same area, as they don’t always agree – and a fire extinguisher. These items remain up front with me, close at hand.

On longer 4-wheeling backcountry trips, additional supplies may be needed:
Tire irons and an inner tube or an extra spare.
Compressor or manual tire pump.
2 gallons of water for the radiator.
1 gallon of engine oil.
5 gallons of spare gas/diesel in a jerry can.
Appropriate manuals for the vehicle to aid in trailside repairs.
Hi-Lift jack (or Jack-all)

Part 1: Lippincott Mine Rd. – 4WD Route to Racetrack Playa
Part 2: The Racetrack Playa
Part 3: Off Road Driving Tips

4-Wheel Trail Driving Tips Text & Photos by Len Wilcox Read more: http://www.desertusa.com/desert-activity/4-wheel-driving.html##ixzz4a7o0twqO

Read more: http://www.desertusa.com/desert-activity/4-wheel-driving.html##ixzz4a7o0twqO

Read more: http://www.desertusa.com/desert-activity/4-wheel-driving.html#ixzz4a7nalB00


Desert Driving Tips

Experienced desert travellers can skip this page if you like, but if you’re a first-timer in the desert or you just don’t have much desert driving experience, we urge you to read and heed.

You will see every kind of road imaginable in the desert, from the multilane interstate freeway to the barely discernible dirt track. All lead to magnificent destinations, and all can be hazardous if you aren’t prepared. Preparation is quite simple: make sure your vehicle is appropriate for the road you have chosen. All vehicles can handle the interstate freeways (and there are more interstates than you may think in the Mojave), but very few vehicles can handle a remote desert track. For the remote roads you’ll need a high-clearance four wheel drive vehicle. You’ll also need the training and ability to handle one. Do not try to drive your small two wheel drive sedan on a back country dirt track. You won’t make it, plain and simple. The key to successful desert driving is this: use your head! Follow these tips:

1) Make a local inquiry of road conditions before turning off the freeway

2) Let someone know where you’re going and when you’re coming back (and don’t change your destination without letting this person know), and tell them when you have come back so they don’t needlessly send Search and Rescue into the middle of nowhere looking for you

3) Carry your cell phone, though you won’t always have coverage. Better to have and not need…

4) Carry a signal mirror. This can be one of those high-tech Air Force survival mirrors or a cheap cosmetic mirror; they work the same. But keep one in your glove compartment

5) Carry warm clothes and blankets. You will experience all weather conditions in the Mojave, from 120 degree summer days to near-Arctic conditions. No foolin’. We have been snowed on more times in the Mojave than anywhere else

6) Carry a good pair of walking or hiking boots, and a wide-brimmed hat

7) Carry food. Restaurants and convenience stores are few and far between, and sand doesn’t taste very good

8) Respect property rights. Believe it or not, much (but not most) of the Mojave is private property. Just as you would not want people driving across your front yard or entering your living room without first asking permission, neither do the property owners of the Mojave. Be courteous. We are not lawyers, so do not take this as legal advice, but this is what’s kept us out of jail for forty years of desert travel: basically, if a road is gated and/or posted with a “No Trespassing” or “Keep Out,” or “Private Road” sign, do not enter. Go someplace else. If a road crosses a fence but there is no gate and no signs, go ahead at your own risk, but be willing to turn around if challenged. If you feel you absolutely must travel a road that is posted or gated, find the owner first and ask permission. Desert property owners have assured us that, in most cases, all they wish is that you ask first, and that you not make a mess while you’re on their property (this is not without some risk, however; it is very difficult to determine who actually owns the property, and whoever gives you “permission” may not be the property owner. Beware). But keep in mind that one of the main reasons people live in the middle of noplace is that they wish not to be disturbed. It’s rare, but if you disturb the wrong person or trespass the wrong road, you may encounter a property owner who will dispense with calling the county sheriff and show you the wrong end of a shotgun instead. That’s why we just turn around when we encounter posted or gated roads. Much of the Mojave is military property, and the above advice applies there as well. The military is very serious about trespassing, and if you trespass on military or other government land you will find yourself in front of a federal magistrate explaining why you did it. In any case, if you trespass on private or military property, you’re breaking the law and you can be fined and even do time for it.

9) Weapons. Should you carry a weapon? We do whenever we’re on back roads. The Mojave is reasonably safe and there are no gangs or roving bands of highway robbers, but like all places, the Mojave has its bad apples. The difference between the barren Mojave and downtown LA is that it takes a cop several hours to respond to the Mojave, if you’re even able to contact one. The decision whether or not to carry a weapon is totally up to you, but if you decide to do so, obey all firearms laws, and be safe.

10) And most important: carry water. Lots of it! You’ll need, at a bare minimum, one gallon per person per day. Seriously. Even if you never leave the freeway, make sure you have plenty of water. You may be on a heavily tavelled interstate freeway, but if you break down and the tow truck takes six hours to show (not an uncommon situation), you can get mighty thirsty. By the way, coffee, soda pop, alcohol, or sports drinks are not substitutes for water. They actually dehydrate you. If you absolutely must have your trendy sports drink, dilute it with four parts water to one part sports drink, and then drink only a little. Oh, and don’t take salt tablets; they do far more harm than good, and stories of their benefits are just old wives’ tales. Your body’s electrolytes can be maintained with just a potato chip or two, and potato chips are much more appetizing than salt tablets.

If you break down:

Don’t panic. You’re not the first person to beak down in the desert. Stay with your vehicle and wait for your friend to report you missing. Wait for a Highway Patrol officer or good samaritan to come by. Don’t try to walk out unless you have no other choice. Exhaust all means, such as your cell phone and signal mirror, before you attempt walking. If it’s hot and you must walk, wait until evening or night. But it’s just best not to attempt to walk. Stay with your vehicle. A car is much more easily spotted from the air than a lone person (we know; we’ve had to do it). After a breakdown in a remote area the temptation to try to walk out is strong. You’ve just got to resist it.

If you are new to desert driving, or new to driving in California (especially if you are visiting from the UK, Australia, or New Zealand), plase visit Hamish Reid’s superb website “California Driving: a Survival Guide.” Mr. Reid offers far more insight into desert driving than we can here, and his writing is very entertaining. We reccomend this site highly even if you are a hard core native Californian driver.

Desert Driving Tips







Desert Driving
California Driving: A Survival Guide

California’s deserts — the Mojave, Death Valley, Owens Valley, etc. — are strange and beautiful, and form a large part of the state; they’re also surprisingly accessible, as long as you use some common sense and take a few precautions.

Zzyzx Road
Zzyzx Road

Don’t be intimidated by the idea of driving through the great California deserts. Compared to driving through the typical Australian, African, or Asian deserts, touring the deserts here by car is usually safe, convenient, and enjoyable, and you’ll see some of the best parts of California, including the Mojave desert, Death Valley, Panamint Valley, the beautiful Mono Lake, and the Owens Valley (at least).

Maybe a third of California is desert, but it’s not necessarily the sort of desert many visitors expect: most of the deserts in California are mountainous, and covered in sage brush and scrub (or Joshua trees), and except for a few spectacular locations like the Eureka Dunes, they’re not the endless sand dunes of the Sahara that some people tend to think of when they hear the word “desert”. Parts of the Californian deserts are even covered in snow in winter, which seems to surprise a lot of visitors.

California’s deserts offer much more than just driving: there’s also hiking, camping, or even just lazing about at a nice hotel or resort (see the Mojave Treks site for some offbeat ideas for places to visit in just the Mojave alone). There are dozens of options from State and National Park campsites, through cheap motels, to expensive resorts; and plenty of package tours cover the whole spectrum from stay-in-the-bus sightseeing to guided off-road four wheel drive convoys. But way off the beaten track, the deserts here are still wild and dangerous, and while most tourists won’t need to worry about that, there are still some rules and common sense things you should consider.

Since most of California’s deserts are crossed by freeways or major highways, a lot of desert driving can be done on good roads with gas, food, water, and accommodation available at convenient locations. Unless you’re really going down obscure back roads or completely off-road, most roads will be paved or fairly good condition gravel; many of the most popular routes across the deserts are actually freeways or highways. Gas stations are usually within easy reach of wherever you are (but gas will usually be more expensive here than in urban and suburban areas). Most of the larger truck stops and small settlements along the highways and freeways will have some sort of cafes and cheap motels as well.

Yucca Tree near Darwin, California

Except during winter, the Californian deserts get really hot, with daily temperatures in the 45 degrees celsius range (I’ve experienced temperatures in Death Valley that were above 50C), and with very low humidity. Death Valley is the hottest place on earth (and one of the driest), and much of the rest of the Mojave is also exceptionally hot. Europeans and Britons, by and large will not have much experience with this, so try to remember to protect both yourself and your car:

If you’re uncomfortable with really high temperatures, don’t drive through the desert in summer. Do something else — go on a wine tasting tour of the Napa valley, or go to the beach, or do something a little less likely to give yourself heat stroke. If you have to cross the desert in the summer, stick to the freeways and use an air-conditioned car.
Always carry enough water for you and your passengers to survive in the desert if your car breaks down. If you’re going away from the main roads and tracks, plan on needing three days’ water for each person; otherwise one day is probably sufficient. The amount of water each person uses per day depends on the surrounding temperature and humidity; in the middle of summer I always carry at least a gallon (4 litres) for each person per day; during the rest of the year it’s probably about half that.
Carry additional water for your car’s radiator. California’s deserts are usually mountainous, and your car may have to rise from near sea level to over 8,000′ within a few tens of miles. This can really stress the cooling system on older cars, so be prepared to take it easy and watch the radiator temperature and coolant levels. Some highways and roads have water tanks at strategic places next to the road for this, but don’t count on it.
Your car should be in good condition, reliable, and physically fairly robust. You don’t need any special sort of car in the desert unless you’re going off-road or along some of the worst tracks away from civilization, but you do want to have a car that isn’t going to break down, and that has enough clearance and traction to cope with the smaller dirt roads if you’re leaving the freeways and highways. Don’t attempt to leave the freeways or major highways and roads with a stretch limo, a large RV, or a low-rider, for example.
Try to have a car with air conditioning. Having said this, don’t overwork your car if it’s small or under-powered by using the air conditioning all the time — turn it off while going up steep or long hills, for example.
When you’re off the freeways and major highways, fill up with gas and water whenever you can — don’t just assume the next gas station will be open or that the next settlement even has one. You can never have too much gas or water in the desert.
California’s deserts actually get quite cold during the night; in winter the temperatures can go below freezing. Always carry enough clothing or blankets to keep warm in these conditions (you’d be surprised at the number of tourists who don’t realize this and who end up complaining about the cold nights even during summer!).
If your car breaks down in the desert, stay with it. Don’t wander off away from the car unless it’s to get help from a clearly-visible call box on the road you’re on or an obviously-inhabited building within a few minute’s walk. Any further than this and you have a good chance of never being seen alive again (and if you have any doubts about how far away something is, don’t leave your car). Try to find some shade near the car, or try to stay in the shade of your car, and don’t waste energy and water with unnecessary movement or exertion. This advice holds for break-downs anywhere in the desert, whether on the side of a major freeway or off the beaten track. If you do leave your car, make sure it’s not in the way of other traffic, lock it, and leave a clearly-visible note under the windshield spelling out who you are, where you’re headed, and when you left. Do this whether you’re leaving because a passing traveler has just offered you a ride into the nearest town so you can call the AAA, or because you’ve just given up after a few hour’s waiting and have stupidly decided to walk the 60 miles back to Barstow on your own. The less well-traveled a particular route is the more likely it is that a passing vehicle will stop and offer assistance. The corollary to this is that if you come across a breakdown or accident in the middle of nowhere, you should be prepared to help as best you can.
No matter what car you’re driving, learn how to change the tires and wheels on your own, and always ensure that the spare tire has the correct air pressure in it (and get an accurate pocket air pressure meter). If it’s a rental car, make sure it’s actually got a spare tire and wheel and associated tools, and you know how to use them. If you’re going deep into the back country and the car you’re driving has those anti-theft lock nuts or studs on the wheels, replace them with normal nuts or studs if you can — the only time I’ve ever been in serious trouble was (early on in my desert driving experiences) when one of my tires went flat and the little attachment to undo the anti-theft lock nuts failed miles from anywhere down a desert mining trail, and I was simply unable to get the wheel off the car with the any of my normal tools (I got back to civilisation by using the instant repair stuff mentioned below combined with stopping literally every mile and pumping the slowly-deflating tire back up again with an electric pump; I did this for about thirty miles, some twenty of which were along a steep, narrow, deeply-rutted dirt track. It took forever). And remember, changing a wheel in the desert can be difficult if you’re surrounded by sand or unstable ground — bring strong flat wooden boards to put under the jack so it doesn’t sink into the sand (the boards don’t have to be especially big, but they do need to be strong enough that the jack won’t go through them, and wide enough that they don’t either sink or tilt in loose dirt or sand). Even better, if you’re going down a desert or mountain back road, learn how to repair (or at least temporarily patch) a flat tire well enough to get you back to a main road. Nothing’s going to repair a large gash or torn side wall, of course, but smaller holes and leaks can be dealt with well enough to get you back on the road if your spare tire is also flat or already in use. Get an electric air pump that will plug into the 12 volt supply (the lighter socket, in most cases) and that can pump quickly enough to overcome slow leaks (smaller pumps are almost useless — get a small truck pump). Those flat repair / canned air things you can buy at car places are also actually fairly useful (if you’ve got enough of them), but not because of the air — the repair liquid / goo stuff does actually do some good in my experience by greatly slowing the air loss for smaller holes, but you also often need to keep stopping and pumping the tire back up every few miles with the electric pump because the goo isn’t entirely effective. The tire repair kits that come with the tools that let you put a flexible plug into holes are also really useful, but, again, only if you also have a reasonable pump, the hole is small, and you know how to use the repair kit.
If you’re going off-road or into the real wilderness, consider renting a satellite phone. You may never need it, but the $50 you paid for it to be with you for a week may be the best investment you ever made — mobile phone coverage is non-existent off the main freeways and highways (and spotty even there) in the deserts, and if your car’s just broken down or you’ve had a serious accident in the middle of nowhere, the phone may save your life (I used to rent one for most desert trips, but then I’m not usually anywhere near places with reliable mobile phone coverage). Alternatively get something like the DeLorme inReach — this will also pay for itself if you ever get into any real trouble away from mobile phone coverage. Yes, I have one; it’s basically replaced the satellite phone for desert driving.
Again, if you’re going to be going to obscure places you’ve never seen before and that are miles from the nearest busy road, get a GPS. I don’t mean one of those city navigator apps on your iPhone (although they’re helpful and I always have one somewhere in the car on longer trips), I mean a reliable hand-held unit that you can use not only to work out where you are and where to go, but that allows you to tell other people where you are (when you’re using the satellite phone to call in a breakdown, for example), and whose batteries don’t die after only a few hours of use. It must at least be able to give you full latitude and longitude readout, maintain a trail so you can backtrack, and you should keep it on you at all times when you’re away from the car. And don’t forget to mark the car’s position on the GPS before you walk away from the car for that nice little stroll up Mt. Ubehebe or to that abandoned lead mine you can see just across that dry river bed over there…
Sidewinder Road newer Barstow, California
Sidewinder Road near Barstow, California

Unless you’re in a hurry, don’t blindly stick to the freeways — there are lots of good roads that parallel or take more scenic back-country routes away from the freeways. For example, Interstate 40 between Barstow and Kingman (Arizona) parallels the old Route 66 highway, an authentic American historical treasure. You’ll see a lot more driving along this part of the old Route 66 (now known as the “National Trails Highway”) than you would if you just go straight down I-40: you’ll be able to stop next to the road pretty much wherever you like, look at the scenery, take photos, or just walk around and explore the ghost towns and the natural landscape (there are volcanic craters, sand dunes, dry lake beds, etc. all within walking distance of the road).

Don’t be put off by the relative remoteness of the area and the apparent lack of traffic on some of these roads — most roads that are marked on an average California desert road map are well-enough traveled that if you do get into trouble, someone is likely to come along within an hour or two (the CHP, for example, patrols the old Route 66 at least once or twice a day).

On the other hand, don’t blindly take just any old route away from the freeways or highways. Unless you’re pretty sure the road is good (for example a reliable map of the area marks it suitable for the sort of car you’re driving), or you know you’ve got enough gas to turn around and come back from any point along the way if the road turns out to be too much for your car, don’t go down a side road or track without asking locals about it (and always take their advice with a grain of salt). Similarly, if you don’t know how to read a map or navigate using topographical information, don’t go off-road or away from the major marked roads. Always make sure you understand the map you’re using, that it’s up-to-date and accurate, and that you really are where you think you are when you’re using it. Again, a good in-car or hand-held GPS can be a real help here.

* * *

For one person’s view of the California desert done over the past twenty or more years, check out my The Desert gallery on Hamish Reid Photography, or the videos below (Drive-by: Desert and Drive-by: Yucca Forest). But note that due to annoying copyright restrictions (that soundtrack…), the first video (Drive-by: Desert) may not be visible in certain countries or on certain devices (and / or may be plagued by ads). Both the gallery and the Drive-by: Desert video are experienced (or jaundiced) looks at some of the realities of the California desert, good and bad (and definitely won’t be everyone’s cup of tea); the Yucca forest video celebrates the desert.


A week in the Mojave Desert: Barstow, Bishop, Dagget, Trona, Bristol Lake, Ludlow, Tehachapi, Amboy, Keeler… the usual suspects.

Desert Driving,








7 Reasons to Get Your Windows Tinted
By Mitchell Schaffer


Window tinting has become a very important part of our business over the past several years. Let’s face it, it makes your vehicle look better. Many of our customers have their windows tinted for visual appeal, but there are many other reasons to consider having a high-quality film applied to your windows. I will outline the 7 top reasons to consider a film application:

Decrease Interior Heat – Quality window film can provide up to a 78% reduction in heat transfer. This reduces the sun’s effect of heating up the inside of your car decreasing the amount of time that you will need to use your air conditioner. This can result in extending the life of the vehicle’s AC system.
Energy Savings – As stated above, reducing interior heat can reduce the demand for AC use. This can have a significant impact on gas mileage and a savings at the pump. who wouldn’t want that?
Reduce Interior Fading – Quality film can block up to 99% of UV ray. This help to reduce fading of your seats, carpets, dash and wood trim. It also works to extend the life of these items.
Reduce Health Risks – Exposure to the sun is known to cause potential health risks to the eyes and skin. By blocking 99% of UV light, window film will also act as a “sunscreen” to protect from the harmful effects of the sun.
Reduces Hazardous Glare – Glare while driving can blind vision and create a dangerous condition. Window film applied to a vehicle’s side and rear windows can significantly reduce glare.
Increase Safety and Security – Accidents can turn a window into thousands of dangerous shards of glass. Window film can act to hold the glass together during an accident. It can also impede a would-be thief from gaining access to your vehicle.
Enhance Appearance – Most shops offer varying shades of window film to appeal to almost any taste. If you do not want to darken the windows, but still want the benefits listed above, we have a film for that too!






All About Window Tinting (and Why You Should Care)
by Keisha Page on

Types of Window Tint

Some vehicle manufacturers have windows that come with a factory tint on the vehicle’s windows, though that is generally only done on the rear windows. This “factory tint” is done by dying the glass. There is sometimes a degree to which the top of the front window is tinted to help reflect the sun’s glare. This is especially apparent on older vehicles with stock windshields, as the graduated green strip is clearly visible.

As an aftermarket upgrade, window tinting is generally done by applying a film to the interior of the vehicle’s windows. While DIY kits are available, the results can be messy, with air bubbles or crooked placement. Window tinting on a vehicle reduces the Visible Light Transference (VLT), and window tinting is graded on the percentage of light that transfers. The lower the percentage of light transmittance, the darker the tint.

Legality of aftermarket window tinting

Each state has different window tinting laws regarding the darkness of the tint legally allowed. You can check the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration website to find the legal tint in your state. Laws vary widely, from 20% in New Mexico to 70% in some states, including Alaska, Vermont, and Michigan. Factory tint generally has a VLT of 74-85%.

Why people tint vehicle windowsThe process of window tintingBreakdown of Different Levels of Tint

Which method of window tinting a vehicle owner chooses is partially determined by how dark the tint should be. Each method produces a different VLT. Which one a driver chooses could be decided by factors such as the reason for tinting, and what percentage of VLT is legal in their state.

Factory Tint: The VLT of factory tint is 74-85%, depending on where the car is originally shipped for sale. This tint is applied by dying the glass, prior to sale.

OEM Tint: OEM tint can be ordered to be any VLT that’s desired, but may be subject to the applicable laws in the state where it’s ordered. OEM tint is generally an upgrade that’s done in European countries. OEM tint is applied by adding a mixture to the glass during manufacturing.

Film Tint: Film tint can be purchased with a VLT as high as 90%, or as low as 2.5%. Film tint is installed by a licensed mechanic.

Why You Should Care About Window Tinting

Tinting windows may or may not help with the resale of a vehicle. It depends on if the tint was done early enough in the ownership of the car to protect the interior, which is a primary consideration for someone looking to purchase a used vehicle. It also depends on if the tint is legal in the state that the purchaser lives in. Another consideration was the method used to tint the windows. If a DIY tint has lots of bubbles or looks shoddy, it’s not going to be perceived as an asset. Lastly, it comes down to personal preference of the buyer. While the current owner of the vehicle might have loved the aftermarket tint, a prospective buyer might not. It is important to note that neither Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds list window tint in their estimates of car sale values.

All About Window Tinting (and Why You Should Care) by Keisha Page



California Window Tinting Laws


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The state of California has very specific laws regarding window tinting on your car.

Every state in the United States has its own percentage of darkness and reflection that your car windows are allowed to have, as well as other specific regulations you may need to know about. Below we’ll list all relevant information pertaining to tinted windows in California.

Window tint darkness

The amount of light that can pass through your car windows is measured in percentages (called VLT), so make sure your tinting film is up to these standards! In California, there is no difference in regulations for sedans, or SUVs and vans, so these laws are for all vehicles.

Windshield doesn’t legally allow any tinting applied to it
Front side windows must pass through more than 70% of light inside your car (70% VLT)
Back side windows and rear window can have any darkness
Window tint reflection

Some tinting film can reflect incoming light, therefore further reducing glare and heat. California doesn’t allow the usage tinting film that has more reflection than a standard window.

Side mirrors

If your car’s rear window is tinted, you must have dual side mirrors on your vehicle.

Restricted tint colors

In California, you’re not allowed to use red or amber window tint film.

Medical exemptions

Though some states allow different window tint percentages due to certain medical conditions, in CA there are no exceptions.

Window film certificate

Drivers are required to have a certificate signed by the tint installing company or from the film manufacturer stating the VLT percentage clearly, and it must display tint film manufacturer’s name and address. Manufacturers are also required to certify the film in this state before they are allowed to sell it.

Some towns or counties in California may have their own special regulations about window tinting, so if you’re in doubt about anything be sure to check with your local law enforcement or DMV offices!

Source
This article about California Window Tinting Laws was last updated in 2017. If any of our information is incomplete or outdated please let us know. Thank you!
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California Window Tinting Laws

California Window Tinting Laws

Car window tinting laws in California were enacted in 1999. We have provided all the necessary information about your car’s window tint, including how dark or reflective the tint is allowed in your state. There are also additional car window tinting rules and regulations in California so make sure you read all about it below.
Window tint darkness in California
The percent of visible light allowed through your car windows is called VLT: Visible Light Transmission. The percentage of light allowed through your film and glass in California is very specific and different for sedan cars and SUV cars or vans.

Tint darkness for sedans:
Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed on the top 4 inches of the windshield.
Front Side windows: Must allow more than 88% of light in.
Back Side windows: Any darkness can be used.
Rear Window: Any darkness can be used.
Tint darkness for SUV and vans:
Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed on the top 4 inches of the windshield.
Front Side windows: Must allow more than 88% of light in.
Back Side windows: Any darkness can be used.
Rear Window: Any darkness can be used.
Window tint reflection in California
Window tint can reflect incoming light and reduce glare and heat. California window tint law permits a certain window reflection when using a tint so make sure you pay attention to this as well.

Tint reflection for sedans:
Front Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Back Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Tint reflection for SUV and vans:
Front Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Back Side windows: Must not be more reflective than a standard window.
Other California window tint rules and regulations:
California does have several other important laws, rules and regulations pertaining to window tinting. They include the following:

Side Mirrors: Dual side mirrors are required if the rear window is tinted.
Restricted Colors: California tint laws do not permit using red, amber or blue tint colors. Side windows must be colorless.
Certificates: Manufacturers of film do need to certify the film they sell in the state and the driver is required to have the certificate in his/her possession.
Stickers: State law does require a certificate or a sticker from the installing company and the manufacturer’s name and address.
Medical Exceptions: California law doesn’t allow any medical exemptions that would allow you use special tint.
Keep in mind that California tinting laws and regulations may be interpreted differently in your county or place of residence and we always recommend you double-check our information with your local DMV or law enforcement authorities.
Our information about window tint laws in California was last updated in 2016 and 2017. Tinting laws in California were enacted in 1999. In case any of our info provided is not up to date or correct be sure to contact us so we can fix it. Thanks!






What is the biggest truck in the world?
BY KRISTEN HALL-GEISLER AUTO | MODERN TRUCKS

The world’s biggest truck isn’t a Ford F-450 Crew Cab pickup truck, or even a Mack truck with a double trailer. The biggest trucks in the world are used in mining, and perhaps calling them big is an understatement — these trucks are truly enormous.

The giant dump trucks used to haul heavy metal ores out of mining pits weigh in the neighborhood of one million pounds (453,592 kilograms) and can carry and dump more than 300 tons (300,000 kilograms) of material in the back. Where a Honda Fit has 117 horsepower and a Jaguar XF has 300 horsepower, these mining trucks have about 3,000 horsepower available for moving all that mass.
Maintenance foreman Gary Frost inspects huge dump trucks before they start the day at Barrick’s Ruby Hill Mine outside Eureka, Nev., in 2006. They’re definitely big, but these aren’t the biggest mining trucks in use.

MORE ON TRUCKS
Top 5 Monster Truck Videos
How Super Truck Racing Works

What is the biggest truck in the world? Also, Top 5 Monster Truck Videos How Super Truck Racing Works, click here



2014 Musgrave Harbour Demolition Derby – Small Car Heat










Humvee Shootout! Banks Power Armored Humvee vs. Stock M1116 HMMWV! – Head 2 Head Ep 43








On this episode of Head 2 Head, Motor Trend’s Mike Febbo and off-road racer Joe Bacal head to the desert to pit the

Ford Raptor against the Ram Runner.

Find out which high-performance pre-runner tames the tarmac and destroys the dirt the best!

Head 2 Head appears every fourth Wednesday on the Motor Trend channel.
http://www.youtube.com/motortrend

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Website – http://www.motortrend.com & http://www.automobilemag.com










The world’s biggest mining dump trucks

Mining trucks keep on getting bigger and bigger, as miners increasingly opt for huge capacity trucks with greater operational efficiency. Recently launched, the Belaz 75710 is by far the world’s biggest dump truck, with the capacity to haul a staggering 496t of payload. Mining-technology.com profiles the 10 biggest mining dump trucks, based on their payload capacity.

Belaz 75710, with payload capacity of 496t, is the biggest mining dump truck in the world. The ultra-heavy dump truck was launched by the Belarusian Company Belaz in October 2013 under an order from a Russian mining company. Sales of Belaz 75710 trucks are scheduled to start in 2014.

The truck is 20.6m long, 8.16m high and 9.87m wide. The empty weight of the vehicle is 360t. Belaz 75710 features eight large-size Michelin tubeless pneumatic tyres and two 16-cylinder turbocharged diesel engines. The power output of each engine is 2,300HP. The vehicle uses electromechanical transmission powered by alternating current. The top speed of the truck is 64km/h.

The world’s biggest mining dump trucks







Transportation History, 1800-1900

A short video overview of the history of transportation in America. Produced by the History Channel in collaboration with the National Museum of American History.
Between 1800 and 1900, the way Americans moved around their world changed drastically.

In 1800, the only practical way to travel and trade across long distances was along the nation’s natural waterways. As a result, settlement clung to the nation’s coasts and rivers. A few roads connected major cities, but travel on them was difficult and time-consuming.

One hundred years later, railroads sped along thousands of miles of track. Large ships moved passengers and freight across the oceans and smaller boats plied the nation’s rivers, lakes, and canals. Bicycles, carriages, and wagons rolled over thousands of miles of roads. Seventy-five million people lived coast to coast, many in towns and cities that had sprouted up along the new routes.

One of the fastest growing of these young cities was Chicago. In 1800 the state of Illinois didn’t exist; by 1900, its largest city was an economic powerhouse with over 1.6 million residents. Located at the intersection of river, lake and railroad routes, Chicago’s industrial, manufacturing and commercial life depended on the boats and trains traveling into and out of the city. Lake steamers carried coal and iron ore to Chicago’s steel mills. Railroads brought livestock to the city’s stockyards and shipped sides of beef, pork, and lamb to the rest of the country.

Sears, Roebuck and Company and Montgomery Ward—both Chicago firms— sold everything including the kitchen sink and guaranteed delivery to the nation’s doorstep, or at least to the nearest railroad station.

By 1900, the average American had come to depend on far-flung places for the basic staples of life. Fruit from California, furniture from Chicago and clothes from New York now criss-crossed the country with a speed and ease unheard of a century earlier.









The History of Transportation
in the United States: Ships, Trains,
Cars and Planes

This week, travel back in time to explore the history of transportation in the United States.

In 1800, Americans elected Thomas Jefferson as their third president. Jefferson had a wish. He wanted to discover a waterway that crossed from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific. He wanted to build a system of trade that connected people throughout the country. At that time the United States did not stretch all the way across the continent.

Jefferson proposed that a group of explorers travel across North America in search of such a waterway. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led the exploration west from 1803 to 1806. They discovered that the Rocky Mountains divided the land. They also found no coast-to-coast waterway.

So Jefferson decided that a different transportation system would best connect American communities. This system involved roads, rivers and railroads. It also included the digging of waterways.

By the middle of the 1800s, dirt roads had been built in parts of the nation. The use of river steamboats increased. Boats also traveled along man-made canals which strengthened local economies.

The American railroad system began. Many people did not believe train technology would work. In time, railroads became the most popular form of land transportation in the United States.

In 19th-century American culture, railroads were more than just a way to travel. Trains also found their way into the works of writers like Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Walt Whitman.

In 1876, the United States celebrated its 100th birthday. By now, there were new ways to move people and goods between farms, towns and cities. The flow of business changed. Lives improved.

Within those first 100 years, transportation links had helped form a new national economy.

(MUSIC: “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad”)

Workers finished the first coast-to-coast railroad in 1869. Towns and cities could develop farther away from major waterways and the coasts. But, to develop economically, many small communities had to build links to the railroads.

Railroads helped many industries, including agriculture. Farmers had a new way to send wheat and grain to ports. From there, ships could carry the goods around the world.

Trains had special container cars with ice to keep meat, milk and other goods cold for long distances on their way to market.

People could now get fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the year. Locally grown crops could be sold nationally. Farmers often hired immigrant workers from Asia and Mexico to plant, harvest and pack these foods.

By the early 1900s, American cities had grown. So, too, had public transportation. The electric streetcar became a common form of transportation. These trolleys ran on metal tracks built into streets.

click here for the full report.
http://www.manythings.org/voa/history/249.html






History of the Pickup Truck
An all-American innovation, the pickup truck gave ranchers another trusted and versatile workhorse on the range.
By Grant Davis

World War I

In the 1910s, America’s automobile business was booming. Yet not until a purchase order from the U.S. Army in 1918 did the Dodge brothers develop a half-ton multipurpose truck, jumpstarting the category of light-duty trucks. Dodge’s original truck had a max payload of 1,000 pounds and was powered by a 35-horsepower, four-cylinder engine with a three-speed transmission. During this time, the first Chevy truck, the Model 490 (named after its sticker price, $490) went on sale with a paltry 21.7-horesepower, four-cylinder engine. Chevy buyers were, however, expected to build their own cab, truck bed, and body onto the chassis or pay an extra $100-plus for an aftermarket cab that bolted onto the frame.

1920s

Henry Ford saw the potential of the pickup, and in 1925 the Ford Motor Company started making the “Ford Model T Runabout with Pickup Body,” priced at $281. Buyers enjoyed the reasonable price and steel bed that was just 56 inches long, 40 inches wide, and 13 inches high. The bed came with pockets for holding stakes and had heavy-duty rear leaf springs. Power came from a 40-horsepower, four-cylinder engine. Ford built 33,800 pickups that first year alone. In order to speed up production, Ford also took a cue from the cattle industry, adopting his famous assembly line from the Armour Meatpacking Company’s method of efficiently processing cow and pig carcasses.

1930s–WWII When Ford introduced its 65-horsepower V8 engine in 1932, the company had already sold 3 million pickups. Toward the end of the ’30s, the modern pickup as we know it was introduced with a full cab, a choice of high bed walls or as a flat bed, and V6 or V8 engines. A 1937 Chevy 3/4-ton came with 85-horsepower. Dodge had moved to a 75-horsepower six-cylinder engine. By the 1940s, pickup trucks started to get longer and more massive, with distinctive grills that set them apart from cars. With this boost in size came more power, more passenger room, and bigger beds. With the onset of WWII, civilian pickup truck production halted as raw materials and manpower was diverted to the war effort.

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Post-war

In 1947, Chevy launched the size race with its new light-duty pickup and the first three-man seat. It had a roomier cab, better visibility through bigger windows, and a higher seat height. Dodge’s B-Series truck followed the same trend, notable for the bed’s high walls, great for hauling. Engines averaged 90–100 horsepower. In 1948, Ford launched the original F-Series with an inline six or V8. The first civilian Jeep, the CJ-2A, was introduced in 1945 to replace farm workhorses; its belt-drive attachment served as a mobile power supply for farm implements. Jeep offered cash awards to people who came up with unique applications for the $1,090 CJ, like the first Zamboni ice-resurfacing machine.

1950s–today

read the full article. In the 1910s, America’s automobile business was booming



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10 top cars for older drivers
By Jim Henry • Bankrate.com

AUTO 10 top cars for older drivers By Jim Henry • Bankrate.com  Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/auto/10-top-cars-for-older-drivers-1.aspx#ixzz4X9edd0QC  Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook, 29 palms classifieds, tinting 29 palms, tint 29 palms, tint yucca valley, window tint 29 palms, window tint morongo valley, window auto tinting landers ca., joshua tree classifieds.

Older drivers face many unique challenges, starting with the problem of simply getting in and out of a car and adjusting the driver’s seat once they get there.

Ch. 5: Top 10
10 top cars for older drivers
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Chapter123456ALL
Those may sound like trivial criteria in choosing a particular car — as opposed to more typical concerns like horsepower or gas mileage — but air bags make the proper seating position a matter of life and death.
Drivers sitting too close to the steering wheel-mounted air bag can be injured or even killed if the air bag goes off in a collision, according to the American Automobile Association, or AAA. It recommends sitting at least 10 inches away from the air bag.

Some shorter drivers — a category that includes many women as well as older drivers — have a problem doing that because they can’t reach the pedals if they sit that far away from the steering wheel. A growing number of cars have power-adjustable pedals for that reason.

Catering to older drivers is important. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there will be more than 40 million U.S. drivers age 65 and older by 2020, up from 29 million in 2005.

Accordingly, the AAA, working with the University of Florida’s National Older Driver Research and Training Center, has come up with a list of “Smart Features for Mature Drivers.”

Many of those features focus on easy access and to the ability to adjust the seats, mirrors, and the gas and brake pedals.

Crossover vehicles, which are higher than most cars but lower than most SUVs, score well on the AAA list because it’s easier for older drivers to slip in and out of the driver’s seat without having to climb a stepladder or lower themselves into a hole.

The AAA, AARP and the American Occupational Therapy Association also co-sponsor a program called CarFit, which coaches older drivers how to adjust their seating position.

Eager to avoid being labeled an “old person’s car,” the car companies stress that features that make cars attractive to older people — like buttons and controls that are easy to reach, simple and legible — are attractive for everyone.

Here are our picks of 10 of the best cars when it comes to having features that appeal to older drivers:

10 best cars for older drivers
1. BMW 7 Series 6. Hyundai Veracruz
2. Cadillac SRX 7. Mercedes-Benz E-Class
3. Chrysler 300 8. Nissan Cube
4. Ford Taurus 9. Toyota RAV-4
5. Honda Odyssey 10. Volvo XC60

old-1-bmw7
BMW 7 Series
Body style: Sedan
Starting price: $81,125
Feature for older drivers: Night Vision
Night vision is consistently one of the first problem areas for aging drivers, according to traffic safety experts. BMW offers a high-tech night vision system on some of its upscale models that can see in the dark using an infrared camera that detects and displays warm objects like pedestrians or deer. The BMW system is a $2,600 option on the 750i and 750Li sedans.

old-2-cadillacsrx
Cadillac SRX
Body style: Crossover
Starting price: $41,235
Feature for older drivers: Easy access
The 2010 Cadillac SRX is a redesigned model. The AAA says crossovers are good for older drivers because the easiest seat height for them is around hip level. Like other crossovers, the SRX is built on a car-like platform that’s welded into a single piece. A traditional truck consists of a body bolted on a ladder-like frame. It’s sturdier, but rides rougher. The SRX also comes with GM’s OnStar system that automatically notifies emergency workers if an air bag goes off in an accident.

old-3-chrysler300
Chrysler 300
Body style: Sedan
Starting price: $27,665
Feature for older drivers: Power-adjustable pedals
The Chrysler 300 has nearly all the “Smart Features for Mature Drivers” recommended by the AAA, including power-adjustable pedals as an option on the entry-level model, which are standard on better-equipped versions. Adjustable pedals and a telescoping steering wheel can prevent injuries, by keeping a shorter driver from sitting too close to the air bag in the steering-wheel hub.

AUTO 10 top cars for older drivers By Jim Henry • Bankrate.com Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/auto/10-top-cars-for-older-drivers-1.aspx#ixzz4X9edd0QC Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook

Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/auto/10-top-cars-for-older-drivers-1.aspx#ixzz4X9eRHi22
Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook



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9 cars that rarely need a mechanic
By Tara Baukus Mello • Bankrate.com

9 cars that rarely need a mechanic By Tara Baukus Mello • Bankrate.com Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/auto/dependable-cars-that-rarely-need-a-mechanic-1.aspx#ixzz4X9dMoBmI Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook

9 most dependable cars
With Americans owning their cars longer than ever, having confidence it is dependable is a top priority. Auto research firm J.D. Power and Associates released the results of its 2016 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, which surveyed 33,560 original owners of 2013 model-year cars after 3 years of ownership about the problems they had experienced.

Top-rated city car Fiat 500
Top-rated compact car Buick Verano
Top-rated compact premium car Lexus ES
Top-rated compact sporty car Mini Cooper
Top-rated large car Buick LaCrosse

9 cars that rarely need a mechanic By Tara Baukus Mello • Bankrate.com Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/auto/dependable-cars-that-rarely-need-a-mechanic-1.aspx#ixzz4X9dMoBmI Follow us: @Bankrate on Twitter | Bankrate on Facebook

Nine cars were awarded with top honors in dependability in this year’s study. See which autos won in each category, as well as how J.D. Power rated them for overall quality, performance and design.

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Five challenges for self-driving cars
Experts weigh in on the roadblocks and research efforts
BY LAUREL HAMERS 9:00AM, DECEMBER 12, 2016

Magazine issue: Vol. 190, No. 13, December 24, 2016, p. 34
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Self-driving cars promise to transform roadways. There’d be fewer traffic accidents and jams, say proponents, and greater mobility for people who can’t operate a vehicle. The cars could fundamentally change the way we think about getting around.

The technology is already rolling onto American streets: Uber has introduced self-driving cabs in Pittsburgh and is experimenting with self-driving trucks for long-haul commercial deliveries. Google’s prototype vehicles are also roaming the roads. (In all these cases, though, human supervisors are along for the ride.) Automakers like Subaru, Toyota and Tesla are also including features such as automatic braking and guided steering on new cars.

“I don’t think the ‘self-driving car train’ can be stopped,” says Sebastian Thrun, who established and previously led Google’s self-driving car project.

But don’t sell your minivan just yet. Thrun estimates 15 years at least before self-driving cars outnumber conventional cars; others say longer. Technical and scientific experts have weighed in on what big roadblocks remain, and how research can overcome them.

Sensing the surroundings
illustration of a self-driving car
JAMES PROVOST
To a computer, a highway on a clear day looks completely different than it does in fog or at dusk. Self-driving cars have to detect road features in all conditions, regardless of weather or lighting. “I’ve seen promising results for rain, but snow is a hard one,” says John Leonard, a roboticist at MIT.

Sensors need to be reliable, compact and reasonably priced — and paired with detailed maps so a vehicle can make sense of what it sees.

Leonard is working with Toyota to help cars respond safely in variable environments, while others are using data from cars’ onboard cameras to create up-to-date maps. “Modern algorithms run on data,” he says. “It’s their fuel.”

Unexpected encounters
illustration of a self-driving car
JAMES PROVOST
Self-driving cars struggle to interpret unusual situations, like a traffic officer waving vehicles through a red light. Simple rule-based programming won’t always work because it’s impossible to code for every scenario in advance, says Missy Cummings, who directs a Duke University robotics lab.

Body language and other contextual clues help people navigate these situations, but it’s challenging for a computer to tell if, for example, a kid is about to dart into the road. The car “has to be able to abstract; that’s what artificial intelligence is all about,” Cummings says.

In a new approach, her team is investigating whether displays on the car can instead alert pedestrians to what the car is going to do. But results suggest walkers ignore the newfangled displays in favor of more old-fashioned cues — say, eyeballing the speed of the car.

Human-robot interaction
illustration of a self-driving car
JAMES PROVOST
Even with fully autonomous vehicles on the horizon, most self-driving cars will be semiautonomous for at least the foreseeable future. But figuring out who has what responsibilities at what time can be tricky. How does the car notify a passenger who has been reading or taking a nap that it’s time to take over a task, and how does the car confirm that the passenger is ready to act?

“In a sense, you are still concentrating on some of the driving, but you are not really driving,” says Chris Janssen, a cognitive scientist at Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

His lab is studying how people direct their attention in these scenarios. One effort uses EEG machines to look at how people’s brains respond to an alert sound when the people are driving versus riding as a passive passenger (as they would in a self-driving car). Janssen is also interested in the best time to deliver instructions and how explicit the instructions should be.

Ethical dilemmas
illustration of a self-driving car
JAMES PROVOST
In exploring the ethical questions of self-driving cars, Iyad Rahwan, an MIT cognitive scientist, has confirmed that people are selfish: “People buying these cars, they want cars that prioritize the passenger,” says Rahwan — but they want other people’s cars to protect pedestrians instead (SN Online: 6/23/16).

In an online exercise called the Moral Machine, players choose whom to save in different scenarios. Does it matter if the pedestrian is an elderly woman? What if she is jaywalking? Society will need to decide what rules and regulations should govern self-driving cars. For the technology to catch on, decisions will have to incorporate moral judgments while still enticing consumers to embrace automation.

Cybersecurity
illustration of a self-driving car
JAMES PROVOST
In 2015, hackers brought a Jeep to a halt on a St. Louis highway by wirelessly accessing its braking and steering via the onboard entertainment system. The demonstration proved that even conventional vehicles have vulnerabilities that, if exploited, could lead to accidents.

Self-driving cars, which would get updates and maps through the cloud, would be at even greater risk. “The more computing permeates into everyday objects, the harder it is going to be to keep track of the vulnerabilities,” says Sean Smith, a computer scientist at Dartmouth College.

And while terrorists might want to crash cars, Smith can imagine other nefarious acts: For instance, hackers could disable someone’s car and hold it for ransom until receiving a digital payment.

Read the full article: Five challenges for self-driving cars Experts weigh in on the roadblocks and research efforts BY LAUREL HAMERS 9:00AM, DECEMBER 12, 2016



Best Safety Rated Vans/Minivans of 2017
Auto manufacturers continue to make safety a top priority across all makes and models.

Here are the 2017 Vans/Minivans that…

Best Safety Rated Cars – Kelley Blue Book

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Parallel Parking Guide

15 Safety Tips for Driving at Night

ON THE ROAD

The thought of a car accident is very disturbing, but taking precautions will help you avoid them. In this section of TeenDriving.com, we go over some simple best practices for being on the road, making turns, how to handle driving in rough weather, passing, driving on your school campus, and the dreaded merging. We also talk about how to avoid an accident—and what to do if you’re in one.

GENERAL DRIVING TIPS
Something as quick and simple as putting on your seat belt or getting your windshield cleaned can mean the difference between life and death. Being aware of yourself and other drivers and practicing good road etiquette is equally important. Below are some tips to keep you mindful and safe.

Simple but Crucial

Obey the speed limits. Going too fast gives you less time to stop or react. Excess speed is one of the main causes of teenage accidents.
Always wear your seat belt – and make sure all passengers buckle up, too. Don’t try to fit more people in the car than you have seat belts for them to use.
Adjust your car’s head rest to a height behind your head – not your neck – to minimize whiplash in case you’re in an accident.
Make sure your windshield is clean. At sunrise and sunset, light reflecting off your dirty windshield can momentarily blind you from seeing what’s going on.
Experts now recommend that you hold the steering wheel at either 3 and 9 o’clock on the wheel, or even lower at 4 and 8 o’clock. If you’re in an accident and the airbags go off, you’ll be safer with your hands not flying into your face from the impact of the airbags.
Consider Other Drivers

Don’t drive like you own the road. Drive like you own the car.
Don’t make assumptions about what other drivers are going to do. The only thing you can assume about another driver with a turn signal on is that they have a turn signal on. He/she might not be turning at all, and just forgot to turn it off.
Watch out for aggressive drivers, and try to stay out of their way. They are the cause of a lot of accidents – especially on freeways.
Never pull out in front of anyone or swerve into someone else’s lane.
Constant Awareness

Make sure your car always has gas in it – don’t ride around with the gauge on empty.
If you’re in the country, watch out for deer and other animals. If you see an animal approaching, slow down and flash your lights repeatedly. Dusk and dawn are particularly bad times for running into animals, so be on the lookout for them.
When light turns green, make sure intersection clears before you go.
Driving Around School

If you’re lucky enough to have your own car, that’s awesome! But it’s important to be mindful when driving around your school’s campus, or even just when parking there. Here are some tips to keep in mind.

Always stop for school buses with flashing lights. The flashing lights mean that students are either getting on or off the bus, and may be crossing the street. Their safety depends on cars obeying this law.
Don’t park in fire lanes around the school. Not only will you probably get a ticket, but you could be blocking the area where a fire truck might need to par
Try to get to school five to ten minutes early, and leave five minutes late to avoid the mad dash into and out of the parking lot. Lots of accidents happen when people are rushing around.
Always watch for kids getting on and off school buses.
If your school lot has perpendicular spaces (not angled parking), park in a space you can pull straight out of instead of having to back out. Backing out in crowded lots is always tricky.
Don’t leave valuables like wallets, shoes, laptops, jackets, phones, or sports equipment in your car where they can be seen easily.

General Driving Tips | Merging / Turning / Passing | Driving in Bad Weather | Avoiding Accidents

Top Defensive Driving Tips For New Drivers

There are many new drivers who end up getting into accidents, mainly due to their inexperience behind the wheel. This is one of the reasons for the graduated licensing system, so new drivers always have licensed drivers with them until they are ready to be out on the road alone. Here are some statistics about young drivers.
More than 25% of all motor vehicle accidents involve teen drivers, even though teen drivers only account for less than 7% of all drivers on US roads.
The leading cause of death for young people between the ages of 15 and 20 is motor vehicle crashes.
Teenagers are involved in more than 5,000 accidents per every 100,000, compared with 500 accidents per every 100,000 for more experienced adult drivers.
Remember, if you learn to drive defensively and pay attention to everything that is going on around you while you are driving, you will not become one of these statistics.
2
Defensive Driving Tips

There are a few things you should know about defensive driving, and here you will find some really great defensive driving tips for new drivers. (They are actually great for everyone who drives, no matter how long they have been driving.) These tips will help you to know what to do in many situations, so that you can arrive at your destination safe and sound.
TIP 1: Never use a cell phone while driving
If you are chatting on a cell phone or sending and receiving text messages, you will not be giving your driving your full attention, and you will not be aware of what is going on with other drivers around you. Using a cell phone is extremely distracting, and you should only use it when the car is parked. If you need to make an emergency call, make sure that you pull over to a parking lot, or at least the side of the road, before you use your cell phone.
TIP 2: Pay attention to all traffic signs
This is something that many drivers get out of the habit of doing, and they end up speeding or going the wrong way on one-way streets. If you are paying attention to all road signs, you will know what the posted speed limit is, and you can stay within it, which is a big part of defensive driving. Whatever you do, don’t follow what the driver ahead of you is doing. After all, he or she may not be following the rules of the road, and you will not be either, which can lead to an accident pretty quickly. Make sure that you obey all traffic lights as well. One wrong turn at a signal light could end up in a really bad accident.
TIP 3: Never drive too closely behind another vehicle
You need to make sure that there is going to be plenty of room between your vehicle and the vehicle ahead of you, just in case you need to come to a fast stop. If there is not enough room, chances are that you are going to end up rear-ending that vehicle, and even if the accident is the other driver’s fault, your insurance company may still raise your rates, and consider the accident to be your fault.
Try to make sure that there are at least two car lengths between your vehicle and the one ahead of you. This way, you will have room if you need to stop quickly. If you are driving on snow-covered or icy roads, you should make sure there is even more room between yours and the vehicle ahead, because it will take longer to stop.
TIP 4: Learn to drive in all weather conditions
The weather can cause a lot of motor vehicle accidents, so it is best that you do not drive in bad weather, or even after dark, until you are confident in your driving skills. Have someone with you when you drive at night until you are more skilled, and practice winter driving where there is no chance of having an accident, such as in an empty parking lot. It is better to be safe now than sorry later on.
TIP 5: Give others the right of way
There are going to be times when you are going to come to a four way stop or other situations where it may be difficult to figure out who has the right of way. When you are in this type of situation, it is best to just let other drivers have the right of way. If you pull out, and someone is pulling out at the same time, you could end up crashing into each other. It may take a few extra seconds to wait, but you will still get where you are going, and you will get there safely.
Getting your driver’s license is a really great thing, and it is just one more step on your way to adulthood. Remember, once you are a licensed driver, you have a whole new set of responsibilities. You are not only responsible for yourself, but for anyone who happens to be in the vehicle with you when you are driving, and you are responsible for those who are driving around you.
When you drive defensively, you can be sure that you will always be in complete control when you are behind the wheel, and that you will be able to anticipate what other drivers are going to do, so you can be prepared and avoid accidents.

Driving in the USA: top tips Click here for the full report.

Winter Driving Tips

AAA recommends the following winter driving tips:

Avoid driving while you’re fatigued. Getting the proper amount of rest before taking on winter weather tasks reduces driving risks.
Never run a vehicle in an enclosed area, such as a garage.
Make certain your tires are properly inflated.
Keep your gas tank at least half full.
If possible, avoid using your parking brake in cold, rainy and snowy weather.
Do not use cruise control when driving on any slippery surface (wet, ice, sand).
Always look and steer where you want to go.
Use your seat belt every time you get into your vehicle.
Tips for long-distance winter trips:

Watch weather reports prior to a long-distance drive or before driving in isolated areas. Delay trips when especially bad weather is expected. If you must leave, let others know your route, destination and estimated time of arrival.
Always make sure your vehicle is in peak operating condition by having it inspected by a AAA Approved Auto Repair facility.
Keep at least half a tank of gasoline in your vehicle at all times.
Pack a cellular telephone with your local AAA’s telephone number, plus blankets, gloves, hats, food, water and any needed medication in your vehicle.
If you become snow-bound, stay with your vehicle. It provides temporary shelter and makes it easier for rescuers to locate you. Don’t try to walk in a severe storm. It’s easy to lose sight of your vehicle in blowing snow and become lost.
Don’t over exert yourself if you try to push or dig your vehicle out of the snow.
Tie a brightly colored cloth to the antenna or place a cloth at the top of a rolled up window to signal distress. At night, keep the dome light on if possible. It only uses a small amount of electricity and will make it easier for rescuers to find you.
Make sure the exhaust pipe isn’t clogged with snow, ice or mud. A blocked exhaust could cause deadly carbon monoxide gas to leak into the passenger compartment with the engine running.
Use whatever is available to insulate your body from the cold. This could include floor mats, newspapers or paper maps.
If possible run the engine and heater just long enough to remove the chill and to conserve gasoline.
Tips for driving in the snow:

Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
Know your brakes. If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS) and need to slow down quickly, press hard on the pedal-it’s normal for the pedal to vibrate a bit when the ABS is activated.
Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed down hill as slowly as possible.
Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors.

Winter Driving Tips